29 August 2014

Published August 27, 2014 by rochellewisoff

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 Below is the PHOTO PROMPT. This photo from Madison Woods sent a few squeamish writers running from their keyboards. If you’re an FF veteran, you may already have  braved this slimy picture and written a story. It’s perfectly legal to repost or write a new one if you like. 

WILD LIFE

PHOTO PROMPT – Copyright – Madison Woods

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By the time this page goes live I will be on a farm in upstate New York visiting my son and daughter in law. To learn more about what she does click here. I’m told the internet connection isn’t very good up there so chances are I won’t be doing much reading or commenting. 

My story is from August 2012 when Madison was queen of this tangled grapevine.

Genre: Realistic Fiction

Word Count: 99

WILD LIFE

Half naked Himba people in Nambia, a sweaty camera crew and millions of TV viewers witnessed our marriage vows. 

I willingly followed Trevor up the Himalayas, drank sun-scorched canteen water instead of Cabernet and swatted mosquitos in the Amazon.

In Nepal he slipped on something and narrowly escaped being trampled by a choleric elephant. 

“I’m done,” he whispered later. “Let’s go home.”

“You are my home.” 

Back in the states, safe from cheetah attacks and hippo stampedes, Trevor’s mangled body lies on a cold steel table. The driver, texting on her cell phone, never saw him cross the street. 

As it appeared originally. 

86 comments on “29 August 2014

    • Dear Liz,

      This photo got to a few people the first time around, too. As I recall, there were some who took the week off because of it.

      This was one of my favorite stories of mine.

      Back from the farm where I wasn’t able to read stories.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • Rochelle, Good story, and so true. Poor Trevor. The city streets are becoming worse than a jungle. It’s like that old joke where someone asked a person how he got to that side of the street with all the traffic, and he said he was born there. Well written as always. Have a great trip. 🙂 —Susan

    Like

    • Dear Susan,

      Back from the farm. Two days of vacation left.

      The streets are indeed becoming worse. it seems odd to me there should have to be a law against texting while driving. But then if sense was common we’d all have some, right?

      Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • Cold irony is a MUST for any story worth stature – here it is, that underlying cold reality. A sadness, too, but a realisation that they packed more in their short time together than many do in years. Vivid description to go with visual. Thanks for comments you left on my blog. Not sure why it does not take just 1. Usually does. Sorry is difficult, just like Medium so much.
    Interesting to see your ‘other’ style here – though research seen again. A Polish friend of mine, a doctor, lived among the Himba people for a few months. She was, perhaps predictably, humbled, but very sincerely.

    Like

    • Dear Hamish,

      Too many scenarios like this, i.e. stupidity and texting. When I think of my characters in this story I think of Steve Irwin who was taken too soon and the great love he and his wife Terry had for each other.

      I love it that you have a friend in a similar situation. I remember doing quite a bit of research on the Himba people at the time I wrote this. I’m always amazed with where I start when I research and where it leads.

      It seems when I try to leave a comment if I hit return it will post.

      Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

      • PS Once more I can’t figure out how to comment on your Bubblegum story and I want you to know I enjoyed it. Amusing take on the prompt and how bubblegum was “discovered.” I always wondered about that. 😉 Funny.

        Like

  • This is so common.. I have heard those stories of people surviving all those ordeals and ending up quite banally .. Reminds me of Otto Nordenskjöld who was run over by a bus in 1928. (quite limited traffic). He had survived many different expeditions – including spending a winter in Antarctic.. I actually met his widow at a museum as a kid…. My father had the same professorship as he once had —

    Like

    • Dear Sandra,

      Let me try this again. Seems I sent a blank comment. Internet connection on the farm was iffy at best. I read comments on my phone but that was as far as it went. Back at the desk now.

      Thank you for commenting on my story a second time. 😉 It’s still one of my favorites and one of the first when I veered from the obvious.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

  • This is a great public service message. Well done as always Rochelle.

    I always look at the photo prompts hoping that I’ll find time to write something. I recognized the photo right away. I think it was the first FF I wrote. I’m sharing my old link.

    Like

    • Dear Kim,

      It was a public service message two years ago and I think the situation’s only gotten worse.

      This photo caused quite a stir as I recall.

      I couldn’t find your link for this.

      Thank you for commenting.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • Rochelle- I love the irony in your story. So interesting how people think travel is dangerous and often have a false sense of security at home. Very well written. The photo you chose however- Oy Vey! It should have come with a disclaimer-Don’t view over breakfast. Dana

    Like

    • Dear Dana,

      This photo caused a bit of a stir two years ago when Madison posted it. As I recall the census dropped a bit then for people refusing to write for it. I love a challenge. 😉 You’re right, viewing this over breakfast is a bit of a tummy-turner.

      Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • Oh crikey. What a sad ending. (Definitely not gooey) I liked the way you told this. Very powerful and a huge moral to it. “If an elephant is about to trample you – let it” hehe

    Like

    • Dear Madison,

      I love it when you come by. 😀

      I remember this photo causing a bit of consternation on the part of a few writers. I loved the challenge of it. And this still is one of my favorites that I wrote. Doug’s was amazing, too as a I recall and I’m kind of sorry he didn’t re-post it.

      At any rate it was a great prompt.

      Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

    • Dear Plaridel,

      That’s one way of looking at it. The way I see it is that he, as a pedestrian, had the right of way. She shouldn’t have been texting while driving. On the other hand, it’s always good to look both ways before crossing the street.

      Thank you for commenting.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • Who could ever forget that photo prompt. I’ll go find my story.

    You put a nice modern ending to that old tale. The love you showed by the wife was nicely done. I could picture her standing before the table identifying the body. No need to say have fun on your visit.

    Like

    • I found my story from Aug ’12 and added gave it to the froglink. Guess what folks… who else do you think did the same? I thought something about that first line sounded familiar. Nice to read it again.

      Like

        • Dear Ted,

          It was fun for me to go back and read the comments on your story. One of them was mine with the link to my Blogspot with the original post. I don’t go back there often. It was fun to see. I also saw how bad I was about responding to comments.

          Thank you for your comments on my story.

          As for the visit. I had a great time. Almost hated to come back but the internet connection was awful.

          Shalom,

          Rochelle

          Like

    • Dear Joanna,

      I’m back from Upstate New York. I had a lovely time reading, relaxing and writing. The colt in the picture is almost weaned and has already been sold. .My daughter in law is an up and coming horse breeder. Sebastian, the pictured foal, is her first.

      I love steering the bus and WordPress has a wonderful schedule ahead feature that I use all the time.

      I had only been doing Friday Fictioneers for four months when I wrote this story. I’m happy it still has the same impact.

      Thank you. .

      shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

  • Dear Rochelle,

    In reading your story today I was initially worried about that hot canteen of water as the source of tragedy. You see, as a child of four my husband drank out of an old military canteen he’d found in a field, in San Diego, and caught spinal meningitis. It nearly killed him! But no, you waited till the poor fella came home to kill him off. And that made me think of how many reports we hear in the news of soldiers coming home. safe from the wars, only to be killed here on the streets.

    When I first started working with your prompts I really never imagined how much information could be packed into only 100 words. Now each week, when I read the other participants work, I am surprised at the depth that can be achieved!

    Your story was well crafted and deeply moving.
    Lynda

    PS: When this prompt came around the first time I ran away from it. I was clueless! This time I met it head on and had fun with it. Thank you!

    Like

    • Dear Lynda,

      I’m glad you met the prompt head on this time. Your story is delightful.

      There are too many ironic stories out there of people surviving war and coming home only to perish in some freak accident. It happened to a close friend of mine and to my husband’s cousin.

      Thank you.

      shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • Well, your story is new to me, Rochelle! I think your scenario happens a lot. For thrill seekers, I think there may be more safety and sense of routine in taking chances. It’s the common, everyday events that get you. I believe most car accidents happen less than five miles from where people live. Enjoy your time with your son and daughter in law. We’ll be okay. You enjoy!

    Like

    • Dear Amy,

      I’ve heard that about car accidents happening close to home. And how many stories do we hear about someone surviving a war only to be taken out in freak accident?

      The time on the farm was fun and relaxing. I see that Friday Fictioneers has held up nicely in my “absence.”

      Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • An excellent example of (sad) irony, Late Rochelle. Another example would be me sharing Picasa 3 with you and you using your photos instead of mine!! (Sticking my tongue way out at you.) 🙂 I liked the story the first time around and still do. Safe travels or welcome home or, each in its place, both.

    janet

    Like

    • Dear Janet,

      It was a good trip. Always tough to leave your children even when they’re very grown up. It really was the black hole for internet unless I really needed to get out. Even cell phone service up there is dicey. And in many ways it was nice. I got some serious writing done and really enjoyed family, etc. You’ll appreciated the horse pictures forthwith-coming.

      As for Picasa. Yes. You’ve created a monster. Bwahahaha. I’ve done a bunch of new ones.

      Glad you liked the story…again. I’m just catching up on the stories. I really couldn’t access any of them. The comments and likes came to my phone but you know how much phun a phone can be for internet. 😉

      Thank you for coming by.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle.

      Like

  • oh, gosh, a wild life indeed and your story so realistic…the love and hate relationship we have with our cell phones. it was nice to see your story further down the page this week. 🙂

    Like

    • Dear Sun,

      I love my cell phone but texting while driving is just plain stupidity. There shouldn’t have to be a law against it but common sense doesn’t seem to be very common these days, does it?
      I enjoyed my brief respite from the computer and had no way to link my story until yesterday morning.

      Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

  • We are not as safe as we think we are in America. You got that across so well. I have a friend who keeps telling me thank God I’m safely back from Ghana no matter how many times I tell her I was never in danger.

    Lily

    Like

  • Dear Rochelle, What a horrific outcome! After all that hazard duty to come home and get nailed by a stupid person texting. This does happen all the time, Mike had been hit by a woman texting – but he was ok. Hope you enjoy your mini-vacation. Nan 🙂

    Like

  • Eee gads and little fishes (my Mom’s favorite saying) I read this days ago and thought I’d commented – guess not. This is lovely (in it’s own way). So much traumatic adventures in the wild to come home and die by stupidity.

    Like

    • Dear Alicia,

      It’s been a bit of an off week for me with vacation so no worries. At any rate I’m back, it was wonderful and I have to go back to work.

      This one’s an oldie but a goodie and still one of my favorites. Unfortunately we’ve all heard of these kinds of things happening.

      Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • The love of your narrator is so evident in how you tell her story – there is no room for the anger that she must surely feel as such a tragic and preventable ending.

    Like

  • Dear Dawn,

    The time in NY was wonderful on many levels. Very hard to come back. Beautiful countryside and family. A totally relaxing week with time to read and write.

    Glad you liked my story, too. 😉

    Thank you.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Like

  • When I hear on the news that such an accident has occurred because of cell phone use while driving, my mind can’t seem to get beyond the image of that driver…blind to everything and everyone except…that stupid phone. Very sad because it’s happening. hugs…for another good one, Rochelle. And glad you got some time off before the rat race starts anew…

    Like

    • Dear Millie,

      Of course my story’s fiction but there are too many out there that are true. They drive among us. I can’t believe there needs to be a law against texting while driving. But obviously sense is not common.

      Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • I remember this one from first time around, Rochelle. I loved the raw emotion in it then and still do. Having said hat, something about it feels less polished than I’ve come to expect from you. Perhaps I am imposing that sense because I’m looking for it; perhaps you’ve got better with practice (or time, like a fine wine!). Either way, great stuff, sorry I’m late and I hope you enjoyed your break.

    Jen

    Like

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