14 November 2014

Published November 12, 2014 by rochellewisoff

Snorkeling in St. Thomas

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The next PHOTO is the PROMPT.  What kind of story does it tell you? Tell the rest of us in a hundred words or less.  Would your story make sense without the photo? 

My story follows the photo and the blue frog. I appreciate honest comments. 

PHOTO PROMPT -Copyright-Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

PHOTO PROMPT -Copyright-Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

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Genre: Historical Fiction

Word Count: 100

FIRST DRAFT

            “Can’t you imagine little Harry trying to climb the fig trees?” Ida’s eyes glittered. “He would’ve been three this year.”

            “I miss him, too,” Harvey whispered.

            Although his heart ached with loss, Harvey still counted his blessings. What could such a vibrant woman possibly see in him, a wheelchair bound invalid thirty years her senior?

            “Maybe we’ll have another son. For now we have one hundred twenty acres of prime, undeveloped California land to subdivide.” He brushed a tear from her cheek with a kiss. “What shall we call our little town? Harryville?”

            “Don’t be ridiculous. Let’s call it Hollywood.”

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Daeida Hartle Wilcox Beveridge

Daeida Hartell Wilcox Beveridge “The Mother of Hollywood”

Click here for more info.

Harvey Wilcox

Harvey Henderson Wilcox

 

110 comments on “14 November 2014

  • Dear Rochelle,

    I love taking a spin with you through history every week. Every writer worth her/his salt wants to see their work turned into celluloid there in those 120 acres. It’s the only way I’ll ever go there, too.

    Great photo and story to kick off the week with. I hope the Polar Crunch, or whatever the media is calling the current version of a cold wind from the north, is treating you well.

    Aloha,

    Doug

    Like

    • Dear Doug,

      If you like cheesy souvenir shops on every street corner, Hollywood’s the place to be. Actually the greatest thing for me in that neck of the woods is Olive E. Fields, the most adorable, redheaded three year old cherub this side of heaven. If you look in the lower right-hand corner you might see the top of her head.

      I’ll be looking for Pilot Whale Fog in IMAX someday soon.

      Thank you.

      shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • An interesting history, Rochelle.

    Like you, I wasn’t terribly interested when at school. Though today I don’t see that as a burden, so to speak. It does mean there’s so much more to learn and enjoy.

    Like

  • Rochelle, Thanks for gifting us with yet another interesting, entertaining, and informative story. I followed the link. I would guess there are people living in Hollywood who don’t know about its founding. Well written as always. 🙂 — Susan

    Like

    • Dear Susan,

      Who among us actually knows the history of our own hometown? 😉 To be certain, few people are aware of Tinsel Town’s humble beginnings. I really enjoyed the research for this one. What am I saying? I really enjoy research, period.

      Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • Another trip down the annals of history, as ever with a personal glimpse of the characters. You do this kind of thing so well Rochelle – it’s something to look forward to. I had no idea of the background to Tinsel Town – so aptly named.

    Like

    • Dear Janet,

      I don’t know if Harryville was ever truly an option, it just worked well with the rest of the story. 😉 Figland was one of the options. Hm. Nah. That doesn’t do it for me either.

      Thanks for commenting.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • Dear Rochelle,

    If history at school had been dramatised in delightful little snippets like you write, I would have stayed awake in class and passed my end-of-year exams with flying colours. It was taught in such a dry way, but you make it fascinating. Thanks for bringing history to life 🙂

    All the best
    Sarah

    Like

    • Dear Sarah,

      If I’d thought about history in the way that I do now I might have passed, too. 😉 I still am terrible with dates and names once I’ve written about things. But I’ve still managed to learn a lot along the way.

      Thank you for such lovely comments.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Elephant,

      I’m sorry it was sad for you. But on the other hand, if Harvey and Ida hadn’t lost little Harry, Hollywood might never have happened. Now that fires the imagination, doesn’t it?

      Thank you for your sweet comments.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

    • Dear Louise,

      As always is the case, I’ve learned something, too. I’ve become something of a slave to historical fiction. I love finding these great tidbits and fashioning them into stories. Glad you enjoyed.

      Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Vijaya,

      It’s always a challenge to present history in a hundred words. The fact is that Ida and Harvey consoled themselves by taking long carriage rides through what would become Hollywood. Apparently Ida wasn’t one to wallow for long. So I’m glad that came across.

      Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • Fascinating! Here, I learn yet another fascinating bit of history. Now, I want to know all Hollywood’s beginnings. It makes you laugh now, knowing what it’s become. Imagine if it had been HarryVille! The world would be a different place. 🙂

    Like

    • Dear KT,

      My children are grown men but I can’t imagine burying a child so young. I never could find in all my reading how the boy died.

      I wonder if Harryville would’ve made the same impact as Hollywood. 😉

      Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

  • Oh how I love your history lessons, Rochelle, wrapped inside wonderful storytelling! This one was very interesting… but sent me on an even longer journey of reading, as I started chasing links! Amazing that what is Hollywood today, was once just a place to grieve the loss of a child. Great job! Shabbat Shalom, dawn

    Like

    • Dear Dawn,

      I happy that you followed the links. There’s so much to the story that’s hard to cram into a hundred words. No doubt the loss of little Harry was a crushing blow. I never could find what killed him only that he was eighteen months old.

      Thank you for your lovely comments.

      Shabbat Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

  • Great way to learn history. So it was Daeida who really created Hollywood! Interesting. I read the following in wikipedia – “She also created names for the new streets, such as Sunset Boulevard, to appeal to buyers.” Ha! Ha! Nothing has changed in the last 100 years.

    Like

  • Dear Georgia,

    They were like us. Warm human beings with thoughts and emotions. It’s so easy to forget that when reading dehydrated facts in a textbook, isn’t it?

    Thank you for you kind comments.

    Ciao for Niao 😉 and Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Like

  • Dear Susannah,
    How about striking up a tune on that banjo to go with my comment? Personally, I think they should have struck a compromise and called it “Harrywood.” It has a nice ring and creates an interesting visual image. Those poor folks would be blown away if they could see the kind of people who live there now. – Enos “Skin” Flint

    Like

  • That was nice and heartwarming. I think I vaguely remember reading at some point that Hollywood was a corruption of “Holywood” and started out as a religious colony of sorts. Oh, the irony.
    Cheers,
    The Cheerful Dalek

    Like

  • Dear Cheerful Dalek,

    I hadn’t heard that version. The most prevalent one that I could find online was that on one of her trips to visit her family in OH, Ida met a woman on the train who had a summer home in Florida she called Hollywood. Although the Wilcoxes were religious folk and probably wouldn’t be thrilled with what their little village became. 😉

    Thank you.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Like

  • I enjoyed your sweet tale…smiled at that last sentence. I`ve not travelled much in my life but I did visit Hollywood once when spending time with a friend in Newport Beach…brings me back to lovely memories. Your added info and history is a huge bonus, thanks so much!! Shalom, Oliana

    Like

    • Dear Oliana,

      We’ve visited the area a few times, mainly because our only grandchild is there. Her daddy is our middle son. I’m not a huge fan of site seeing anymore. After a while it all runs together and the souvenir shops all carry the same cheesy items (with a few exceptions). The walk of fame is fun and seeing the footprints in front of the Chinese theater is entertaining, but the thing I enjoyed the most on our last visit was a hole-in-the-wall book shop.

      At any rate, I said all that to say, thank you for your sweet comments.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • So touching and tender. Thanks for this history lesson. (What is it about school history classes that switches so many of us off, only to discover a love of it later?) Love Ida’s, ‘Don’t be ridiculous.’ How astute of her to come up with the alternative :).

    Like

    • Dear Sarah Ann,

      We lose the humanity of history in the text books, don’t we? And usually the teachers who present it tend to drone on and on in their lectures. Sort of like eating stale bread.

      Of course my vignette is fiction. As far as I know Harryville wasn’t in the running for the name. But I love to find a piece of history and imagine. The fact is that Ida did come up with the name for the town and a few choice street names as well.

      Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • Rochelle,
    it’s hard to imagine Hollywood ever being undeveloped California wilderness. What a great love story between two very different people. And especially so since it’s historical. Where do you learn all these things?
    -David

    Like

    • Dear David,

      History is rich with love and personality, isn’t it? It’s all out thee on the internet. I generally start with an idea and follow the trail. In this case, I googled Hollywood history. I found the Wilcox’s story fascinating. Sometimes it takes longer to find my story and other times, I ditch the whole thread. That’s what I love about this process. I never know where the muse is going to lead. 😉

      Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • Dear Rochelle, WOW – you are the Professor of History for our class and I love it. You are so entertaining and present the history lesson in a wonderful format! Love it! You inspire me to try and be better! Thank you! Nan 🙂

    Like

  • Good Lord! I seemed to have read this and discussed it with my husband and then forgot to comment 😛 David grew up in Hollywood area and recalls his father and grandfather discussing the Hollywood sign as the Hollywoodland sign. He used to hike around there.
    Your story reminded me of the Stanfords and their young son Leland. Enjoyed this piece and reading the history.
    Ellespeth

    Like

    • Dear Ellespeth,

      I find it interesting that the sign itself was never meant to be the landmark it’s become. It was merely a marketing gimmick to advertise a subdivision called Hollywoodland.

      I’m pleased you got so much out of my little snippet of history. As for such nice comments, I’ll take them anytime. 😉

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

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