29 January 2016

Published January 27, 2016 by rochellewisoff

Pane iced Banner

Sunrise FF Banner

Please include the PHOTO PROMPT with your story. All photos are copyrighted and may not be used outside of Friday Fictioneers without express permission and possible remuneration to the owner. Please be courteous and give credit where credit is due. 

The challenge is 100 WORDS OR LESS. It’s a worthwhile challenge that teaches us as writers how to conserve and use the strongest words to tell our stories. With the number of submissions every week, this is not only a great challenge but also a consideration to other readers. 

The following photo is the PHOTO PROMPT. Study it. Think about it. What kind of story does it tell you? Think outside the box. 

Thank you and Shalom, 

Your Fairy Blog Mother, Rochelle

 

PHOTO PROMPT - © ceayr

PHOTO PROMPT – © ceayr

get the InLinkz code

Genre: Historical Fiction

Word Count: 99

SHOAH

            “Where’s Nadine?” I stamped my foot with childish impatience.

            “The Juif doesn’t live here anymore.” The man hissed through pinched lips.  

            “Because of the Bosche?”

            “No more questions.” The door slammed and he shouted from the other side. “Go away!”

________

            Seventy years later sunlight flickers on ocean waves at Saint-Marc. I walk along the deserted beach where Nadine and I gathered seashells and dreams.

            “Martine, swim with me.” 

            Shielding my eyes, I search the rippling waters. Nadine beckons. I’m warmed by her smile…and the twelve-year-old girl who choked her last in Auschwitz’s Zyklon-B showers lives forever in my heart.

.

.

**Note: Today as I post my story it is 27 January. The United Nations designated January 27—the anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau—as International Holocaust Remembrance Day. A time to remember and say “Never again!” 

.

To learn more about Nadine click here.

Original Artwork © Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

Original Artwork © Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

 

103 comments on “29 January 2016

  • Beautiful piece. Had to read it a second time just because the time shift confused me the first time around. So glad I did. Nadine and all of those poor children deserve to be heard like this!

    Like

    • Dear Melony,

      Alas, Nadine’s story was true for millions. Since you weren’t the only one confused by the time shift, I’ve tweaked it a bit to make it clearer. That’s what receiving constructive crit is all about. 😉 Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

  • This had me choking from tears… Alas I know it will be repeated… not in the same way and maybe not against Jews… but humanity has a way of finding “simple” solution to complex problems… and the world is becoming more and more complex… Stories like this help us remember…

    Like

    • Dear Björn,

      Truly genocide against certain groups seems to be a grisly fact of life. I do see the rise of anti-Semitism in the world so I’m not so sure it won’t happen to the Jews again. It is as unfathomable today as it was to people back then. Thank you for your comments.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Michael,

      It goes beyond sad. I did tweak so perhaps the time shift won’t be so confusing. A wide space and a line don’t seem to be sufficient.

      Whatever the photo makes you think of…go with it.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • Sad story, and a good reminder of the evils that went on there.

    I have managed to do a story for it this week for the first time in over a year 🙂 Hoping to be able to get back to it regularly now 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Al,

      You know by now, that when a prompt leads me there, I go willingly. 😉

      Nice to see you back among the Friday Fictioneers. I know you’ve been busy with your own Sunday challenge. At any rate, welcome back and thank you for reading and commenting on my story.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

  • It was horrific that it happened at all. It’s especially disgusting and heartbreaking that it happened to children. This child was only eleven years older than me. Many of the children, some babies, in those gas chambers, were my age. It’s upsetting even now and makes me tear up. It’s unbelievable that these monsters in human form could believe they could possibly wipe out all Jews. Powerful story, Rochelle. — Suzanne

    Like

    • Dear Suzanne,

      I remember the documentaries on television when I was a child. At the time the Holocaust was less than twenty years in the past. It seems that shadow was always there in those days. In some ways I wish the shadow was still there so people would never forget. Indeed, what kind of monsters could do this to anyone, let alone innocent children.

      It is a favorite soap box of mine and I’ll climb up anytime I see the opportunity. 😉

      Thank you and Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • Your link touched upon an all too familiar theme that we find on our travels in France, that of collaboration with the occupying forces resulting in betrayal, and the heartbreak of moving to another more rural location in the expectation of safety. You do this so well, Rochelle. A fitting acknowledgement of the day.

    Like

    • Dear J Hardy,

      I fear as the survivors are leaving us their stories will be forgotten. I don’t understand how, in this day and age, with films and documentation some say it never happened. It did and I will shout it from the highest mountain until I have no more breath.

      Thank you and Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

  • Heart-wrenching. Never again can’t be said often and loudly enough, especially these days where nationalism, racism, and terror rear their ugly heads again. When will we kill the dragon for good?

    Like

    • Dear GAH,

      A line from Hotel California comes to mind, “We stab it with our steely knives, but we just can’t kill the beast.” I suspect the dragon will die when humans are extinct. 😦 . In other words, with the state of the world, I don’t hold out much hope. Fortunately there are good people in the midst of this.

      Thank you and Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Joy,

      Unfortunately Nadine was a real person who didn’t live to see her thirteenth birthday. Too many stories of boys and girls murdered.

      Thank you for your kind words re my story.

      Shalom and may we never forget

      Rochelle

      Like

    • Dear Martin,

      While I was born after the fact, being Jewish and the child of second generation Americans, I grew up in the shadow of the Holocaust. My mother told me of family members who had perished. I was admonished from a very young age to remember what “they did to us.”

      That being said, I believe anyone born after 1945 has still grown up in that shadow. Not that massacres haven’t happened before or since. But Media made it reality. It was systematic and sinister. May none of us ever forget.

      Re my story, thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

  • Such a powerful story, Rochelle. You’ve brought to light a personal tragedy in Nadine – one suffering little child, not just a statistic among the anonymous millions. This is how we can make sure the horrible history of that time will be remembered, so keep it up.

    Like

    • Dear Margaret,

      I’m sure you know by now that if a prompt inspires me in this direction I will follow. 😉 It is easy to forget when it comes to statistics, isn’t it? But when a statistic has a face it’s a little harder.

      Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • A very touching story. I followed the link to read about her. Sometimes hearing big numbers is totally meaningless while seeing an individual life can bring out the enormity of the inhumanity of the Holocaust. We need to remember Nadine and others, see their haunting smiles, so we remember the people and not just cold numbers. Thank you for the beautiful story!

    Like

  • Beautiful story, Rochelle. I’m so glad there are still people writing about the Holocaust. I worry more and more that people forget.

    I currently live in a city (BIalystok in north-eastern Poland), which was majority Jewish before the war. The few that survived moved to the US or Australia. There are some that work to keep the memory of Jewish Bialystok alive. It is important to remember.

    Like

  • Beautiful story, made even more so by the link you provided. Like others said before me, hearing individual accounts like this makes it even more real and tragic rather than just seeing the huge and horrific numbers our history books tell us. May we never forget, and may it never happen again.

    Like

  • War, prejudice and genocide all seem to be a part of the human condition. I can’t understand how anyone can see other humans as somehow less, but it hasn’t stopped with the downfall of Hitler. Another thought provoking and well characterised story.

    Like

    • Dear Jennifer,

      I am stunned by what the human race is capable of. Evil prevails despite the end of Hitler. I mentioned to another commentor earlier that it’s rather like a game of whack-a-mole. Beat one down and another rears its ugly head.
      Thank you for coming by.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

    • Dear Ansumani,

      Broken down into bite size pieces makes it even harder to swallow. Hundreds of children…easy to become desensitized. One child with a name and a face. Up close and personal.

      Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • The holocaust is a subject that I (like many no doubt) find very difficult to read about or watch documentaries. As a parent I find forcing myself to watch the suffering of children simply too much to bear, yet I followed the link to read about this little girl. I knew what to expect, but was compelled by the image of her innocent face. In Europe now we face a human crisis of truly horrific proportions and monstrous unspeakable acts are being committed against the young, even in the refugé camps on our very borders, but the calculated, systematic process by which this young girl was transported across country borders with the sole intention of her murder in a nazi death camp leaves me at a loss to comprehend. You always know how to make us think and the thoughts your stories provoke linger long after we have finished reading.

    Liked by 2 people

  • The stories of what happened to the Jewish children during the holocaust are so hard to bear but we can not forget them. I remember reading Eli Wiesel’s “Night.” I was so horrified by what he described of the concentration camp, how the children were killed. I woke up in the middle of the night crying about it to my husband. It was so hard to believe that people could commit such terrible acts.

    Like

  • Thank you for sharing such a moving story…real life. We must never forget indeed! It is through gifted storytellers that will publish novels and screenplays that must continue to share these stories. The world must never forget.

    Liked by 1 person

  • My daughter had ‘The Boy in the Striped Pajamas’ in her school syllabus and so we also watched the movie together. It was a sad one to watch and you have recreated that atmosphere here.
    “. . .only the victims and survivors can truly comprehend the awfulness of that time and place; the rest of us live on the other side of the fence, staring through from our own comfortable place, trying in our own clumsy ways to make sense of it all.”
    ― John Boyne, The Boy in the Striped Pajamas

    Liked by 1 person

  • Such a moving piece, Rochelle. I especially enjoyed the last part with her reflecting on the beach. Yes, never again. Your stories are so important to continue to tell, especially as history can be distorted. Well done.

    Like

    • Dear Amy,

      I’m amazed when I research how many stories there are that I’ve never heard before. But then there were six-million people, not including the disabled, the Gypsies, LGBT and anyone else who didn’t fit the Aryan mold or had the audacity to stand up against the Third Reich. I’ll keep telling them when I find them.

      Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Dawn,

      If you clicked on the link below the story you know that Nadine was a real person who lived a tragically short life. She spoke to my heart and I couldn’t not tell her story. Thank you for your affirming words.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

  • Moving story Rochelle. I learn so much from your replies in comment section. Very patiently
    you reply to each and everyone with same interest. Thanks for the link. Always love to read new things. That sketch is beautiful.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Dear Indira,

    You’re very sweet to always read and leave comments. If I’ve taught anything my mission’s accomplished. Thank you for noticing the sketch, I was beginning to think it had become invisible. 😉 (Artist’s ego)

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Like

  • Where do you think you're going without leaving a comment?

    Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

    WordPress.com Logo

    You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

    Twitter picture

    You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

    Facebook photo

    You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

    Google+ photo

    You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

    Connecting to %s

    zicharonot

    Memories and commentary.com site

    e.l. dalke: survivor

    a journey of fractures, in my own words

    Waas Blog

    We all have a unique story….I want to share yours!

    Creativity for You

    Posts about creativity research and application from Thomas Ward, Professor of Psychology, University of Alabama.

    The Wasted Love Song

    life, fiction & other unrealities

    Jellico's Stationhouse

    Come on in and sit a while...

    WHAT PEGMAN SAW

    a weekly flash fiction prompt inspired by google maps

    Lori Ericson, Author

    An author's perspective of mystery and more.

    anelephantcant

    Random thoughts and images, some serious, some humorous, some pointless

    Honie Briggs

    SERIOUSLY!

    Alyssa Davies

    You Can Never Be Overdressed or Overeducated

    Flights of Fancy

    The Totally Unambitious Blog

    The Off Key Of Life

    Or….Identifying The Harmless Unhinged Among Us.

    What's So Funny?

    A WordPress.com humor blog

    The Write Melony

    Renowned Writer Extraordinaire - in my mind!

    unbuttoned or undone

    Hang on, Hang on

    A Dalectable Life

    The little and large things making my life delicious!

    Hoxton Spanish Tutor Info

    This WordPress.com site is the cat’s pajamas

    Sound Bite Fiction

    where nothing is quite what it seems

    yadadarcyyada

    Vague Meanderings of the Broke and Obscure

    mezzojan

    a libretto for the comic opera of my life

    elmowrites

    Writing about writing

    What's for dinner, Doc?

    La Gringa's Kitchen : Flips & Flops in Baja, Mexico

    Claire Fuller

    Writing and art

    Green Writing Room

    Hilary Custance Green's reading and writing notepad

    Oldentimes's Blog

    a little old, a little new, life in the slow land of country living

    Caely in the making

    - one day, they'll say "because of you, I didn't give up" -

    %d bloggers like this: