15 April 2016

Published April 13, 2016 by rochellewisoff

Thoreau NZ birds

Phriday Phictioneers Phone

The following photo is the PROMPT. Keep in mind that all photos are the property of the contributor, therefore copyrighted and require express permission to use for purposes other than Friday Fictioneers. Giving credit to whom credit is due is proper etiquette.

***************************************NOTICE****************************************************************************

Dear Friday Fictioneers,

Our fellow fictioneer CEAYR asked that I extend his apologies for his lack of participation of late. While he doesn’t mean to be rude, our friend is dealing with physical issues that prevent him from being more involved.

Thank you for understanding.

Shalom,

Rochelle

*******************************************************************************************************************************

get the InLinkz code

Genre: Fact and Fiction

Word Count: 100

SOURCE OF KNOWLEDGE 

“‘…The taller officer, an imposing presence with dark skin, fascinated Havah. Although she had read about them in Professor Dietrich’s books about Africa and American history, she had never met a Negro face to face.’”

“What year does your book take place?”  

“1904.”  

“I hate to burst your bubble,” says my fellow writer with smug conviction. “I realize it’s historical fiction but I seriously doubt there would’ve been a black officer back then.”

I whip out my Kansas City history book and point to a photo of uniformed Lafayette Tillman on horseback. “Second one on the KC force. Next question.”

.

.

.

KCTillman

https://rochellewisofffields.wordpress.com/2015/11/10/character-study-lafayette-a-tillman/

 

125 comments on “15 April 2016

    • Dear Sandra,

      To be fair to the other writer, this happened quite some time ago and very early in my writing career. It was a large group and I wasn’t well known. The fun in it was that I had been excited to put Tillman in the story because he was the real deal, but I also knew I was going to get questioned. Sort of like casting my hook and I wasn’t disappointed. 😉

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 2 people

    • Dear Melony,

      This was quite early in my novel writing. I’ve found such wonderfully unexpected things in research. And it has paid off in the long run. I knew that day I was going to be called on it and was prepared. 😉
      Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Rashmi,

      It was such a delicious find that I had to put this amazing man into my novel. He fit like a kid glove. I knew that day I would be questioned and I wasn’t disappointed. 😉 I’m glad you enjoyed. Yes, research is über important, particularly when writing historical fiction.

      Thank you for your kind words.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

  • Several times I have gotten into an argument about a certain historical fact (especially something like an arcane detail about the caliber of such and such weapon available in such and such year). This is why we spend so much time doing unlovely research! Well done.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear J Hardy,

      I really do love research. Ironically, it was something I detested in school. Finding those arcane bits is tantamount to…well, never mind. I felt particularly victorious that day. 😉

      Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

  • A good writer always does their fact check 🙂 nicely done and interesting when compared to the photo prompt. We all keep learning and should keep an open mind I think.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Ifeoma,

      There’s so much to learn and I’m always excited to find little known historical bits. I’m finding lots of them for my third novel that took place right here in my own hometown. I think that sometimes my husband thinks I’ve lost my mind when I do my research happy dances. 😉
      Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

      • Well I hope to learn that research happy dance of yours cause I’ll need it in school 🙂 great find! I’m sure he knows you haven’t lol

        Like

  • Love it, Rochelle! Isn’t it fun when people try to tell you that something didn’t happen, or that someone didn’t do something and you have not only pictoral/video proof, but written word as well! Excellently told. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Jelli,

      There is nothing, almost nothing anyway, that I like better than someone telling me something couldn’t have happened. I knew going into that critique group I would be questioned. I was armed and loaded for bear. 😉

      Thank you for your affirming words.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

  • Well that settles that! Well researched Rochelle. Your love of history shines through so well in your writing and your ability to give such a human perspective to what many would only see as facts and images from a book is captivating. Nicely done.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Good for you for closely checking your sources, Rochelle. I’m sure that particular fellow writer will be very cautious about questioning your material, again, if the person ever does. Well done. I’m so sorry to hear C.E. Ayr is having health problems. All good wishes go to him in getting well again. —- Suzanne

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Suzanne,

      In all honesty, I don’t remember who the person was. It was quite early in my writing path and I was something of a novice. The group was a big one and I didn’t stick with it very long because the schedule interfered with work. I’ll admit that it was a crowning moment.

      Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • Anyone who knows you should not question your facts. I know how meticulous you research and have seen complete changes in your stories and characters as a result. As for me knowing you aren’t crazy when you do your happy dances? Hey, you are a writer…….right?

    Like

    • Dear Björn,

      As you can tell by the article, Lafayette Tillman was a rarity in Kansas City. But he really lived and served here. I love research. 😀
      Just when we think we’ve progressed we take steps backward.

      Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • Dearest Rochelle,
    This was great! Nothing more satisfying than having proof to back yourself up…
    And how you got this story out of that image is beyond me….
    Off to do mine now as I did not play last week…
    Lotsa love,
    Dale

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Sandra,

      At the time I knew the question would be raised. In fact, had I not been the author with the info I would have made the same assumption. How much do I love research?!
      Thank you for coming by and leaving such a nice comment in your wake.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

    • Dear Amy,

      This person didn’t know me very well, did she? Thank you for noticing the blending of stories. To be fair to my critiquer, if I’d been in her position I would’ve questioned the character, too. Ah the joy of research. I’ve learned more in the past ten years of writing than I ever learned in school. 😉

      Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Margaret,

      If I’d been in the other lady’s shoes I probably would’ve made the same assumption. The fun in it was that I knew someone would contest the scene based on those predictable assumptions and I was ready. 😉

      Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

  • Great piece – it always amazes me how there were black people in various positions of authority so long ago yet it was still legal to segregate and discriminate so many decades later.

    Like

    • Dear Ali,

      Right you are. Kansas City was very segregated at the time and I’m sure that Officer Tillman faced some prejudiced backlash. Yet, according to all I can find on him, he faced the odds and rose above them. I only wish I could find more about this fascinating man.

      Thank you for liking my story and taking the time to say so.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Petru,

      It’s nice to see you here again. Participation is up and down these days. There’s no split group that I know of although I know that some writers participate in more than one blog challenge a week. Glad you liked my story.

      Thank you
      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

  • Hello, Rochelle!

    I apologize for failing to participate in the FF Community last time. I didn’t realize it was based on close interaction with fellow writers, which I think is great.

    I loved your story. It had a “drop the mic” ending. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  • Hah! Nicely done, Rochelle! (And I thought I’d actually commented before, then realized I had imagined my comment – sorry about being so late on it!)
    I really like it when we have our facts in order and can back up our statements, don’t you?
    And I love the meta-nature of your story, too. Plus, I’ve learned something, as I do every time I read one of your stories. Thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Vijaya,

      No worries. I’ve been late getting around myself this week. With a car accident Saturday, a newspaper article to write and the ubiquitous third novel I’ve been a bit rattled this week. Thankfully I wasn’t hurt, but I can’t say the same about my poor car.

      At the time of the story, which took place about ten years ago, I’d already fallen in love with research. When I found Lafayette Tillman in the history book pictured I knew I had to put him in my novel. In fact I put him in this next one as well. He looks like an impressive man and history supports it.

      Thank you for your words that are better late than never. Although, since we are FRIDAY fictioneers, you’re right on time.

      Shalom,

      Your Fairy Blog Mother

      Like

      • Dear Rochelle,

        It sounds like it was an intense week. So sorry about your accident. I know how that rattled feeling feels, having been in a similar couple of incidents where the car was hurt, but I wasn’t. So, is the third novel close to completion, or did I miss something?
        You are a busy person, it seems, despite your “retirement” — again, I empathize, being in the same boat.
        Thanks for understanding, and it’s good to be “on time!”

        Love,
        Vijaya

        Like

  • Dear Binney,
    Leave it to you to see a coloring book and write a story about a man of color. I’m surprised you didn’t include the entire Kansas City Monarch baseball team. It’s a nice time of year to paint the city Royal Blue.

    Best wishes for a colorful day,
    Crayola

    Like

    • Dear Crayola,

      Give me time. the Kansas City Monarchs could make their way into a book. Lafayette Tillman was not only a man of color but a colorful man as well.
      I’m hoping today will be colored green as in fix my broken car. I was sideswiped Saturday by an unlicensed driver in a hurry to get to our accident. I’ll stop there with a thank you. Back to my coloring book…

      Shalom,

      Binney

      Like

  • I love how I learn new things from your posts. I find it awful how history tends to get suppressed or rather true facts do, in order to create the history that the history-makers wish to be told. Thank you for uncovering some of it.

    Glad to hear you were not injured in your car accident. Hope everything goes well with getting the car fixed.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear MTO,

      Nothing pleases me more than to have a reader say she’s learned something from something I’ve written. While the Tillmans were an illustrious family in KC, his son being a physician and on the staff of the first black hospital, I can find precious little.

      Thank you for your well wishes concerning my poor mutilated car.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

  • Rochelle,

    I love it, her come back and that fact that a Negro was on the police force.
    Great job.
    I to am taking a break. No other reason other than I’m tired of blogging. I hope to get over it and be back soon.

    Blessings to you,
    Phyllis

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Tamal,

      The person to ask about the photo and what it is is Kent Bonham. His link is under the photo. I honestly couldn’t tell you. I’m sure everyone’s wondering about the drawing.

      Glad you liked my story and took the time to say so.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

  • So, I made a boo-boo. I used the newspaper clipping as my photo prompt before I realized it was the coloring page. So, instead of just deleting the piece, I wrote two this week. Hope you don’t mind. 😀

    Like

  • Researching information for articals is something I really love doing, but since I joined in with Fri Fictioneers, I find myself gaining so much more tantalising knowledge from each writers stories. Thank you for your hosting of FF

    Liked by 1 person

  • Dear Rochelle

    Your research always pays dividends and never more so than in this story, well done. One of the main attractions of FF are the things I learn, not only from the stories but through the comments too.

    I am also waiting patiently for more news about Havah… more speed to your pen (or laptop or quill).

    Best wishes

    Dee

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Dee,

      This was definitely a crowning moment for me in the research department. 😉

      When you say you’re waiting for news of Havah, does this mean you’ve read From Silt and Ashes? I’m a little over halfway through As One Must, One Can. Of course little snippets have a way of showing up as ‘flashes.’

      Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • Wonderful story here Rochelle – on many levels. I have to admit though, I initially thought “what has this to do with the photo prompt?” then started to chuckle at my own silliness. Great stepping off point … and I like where you ended up …. books, contain all kinds of possibilities 🙂

    Shalom

    Liked by 1 person

  • Dear Wildchild,

    Funny, I thought my connection to the prompt was pretty clear. 😉 Stepping off point is the operative here. I’m glad you liked my story and took the time to say so.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Like

  • Well, that was a very well written horrific story. Having just finished a textbook that totally glossed over WWII’s horror stories for the usual “baby boom and prosperity” and all the new household appliances that came onto the market after the war, I am wishing more professors would choose real books with real stories that could inspire students to become leaders who don’t force nations to repeat history. Your story, although gruesome and terribly sad, was a nice change from everything I’ve been reading lately.

    Like

    • Dear Stephonie,

      I am confused by this comment only because I believe it managed to end up on the wrong page. I think this comment goes with In Memory of 24682, instead it’s on the page for another that was more upbeat. No problem as long as we both get the connection it’s all good.

      I hate it that history books gloss over what isn’t all that far in the past. When I wrote a story about the horrors of Agent Orange someone commented that she’d learned nothing of the Vietnam war. Really? A huge part of my adolescence.

      And I’m sorry I didn’t reply sooner. Thank you so much for swinging by no matter where you landed. 😉 I miss you terribly.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

      • Rochelle, it is good to see that my comment found you (my apology for the mismatch). Any moment I can steal for myself I’d rather be fictioning it up with the fictioneers. Alas, I have to sleep…and bathe. More later, Steph.

        Like

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