27 January 2017

Published January 25, 2017 by rochellewisoff

Undersea St. Thomas 4 Meme

Note: You can call me crabby or controlling if you like, but…over the past few weeks some writers are going way over the word limit. No one will be kicked out for doing so, but the challenge is to write a story in 100 words or less. While I don’t take issue with a word or two over, last week one of them went over 200 words. 

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The next photo is the PROMPT. Remember, all photos are property of the photographer, donated for use in Friday Fictioneers only. They shouldn’t be used for any other purpose without express permission. It is proper etiquette to give the contributor credit. 

PHOTO PROMPT © Al Forbes

PHOTO PROMPT © Al Forbes

Think you’ve seen this photo before? You have. It’s been pointed out that I posted this prompt in February. 😯  A repost was unintentional, but is what it is. If you have a story for it you were happy with, feel free to use it. 😉 Thank you Dawn and Suzanne for pointing it out. This is a first. What was I thinking? 

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Genre: Historical Fiction

Word Count: 100

Not exactly a flash fiction and not exactly an excerpt. Here’s a scene from AS ONE MUST, ONE CAN. 

OLIVE BRANCH

            Nikolai Derevenko and his father had hardly spoken in twenty years so Sergei’s sudden appearance in Kansas City for his grandson’s graduation mystified him.

            Sergei rotated the crank on the front of the car, starting the motor, and climbed into the driver’s seat. “It’s a Ford. Almost new—Model N, made in 1906,” he shouted over the clatter. “My gift. Tomorrow you learn to drive it.”

            Nikolai scowled. “Thanks, but no thanks. God gave us legs and there are streetcars. With all of your frivolous spending you won’t have enough for your fare back to Russia.”

            “I’m not going back.”

*

*

nikolai

Dr. Nikolai Derevenk0 © Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

Sergei Derevenko © Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

Sergei Derevenko © Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

Vasily Derevenko © Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

Vasily Derevenko © Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

***

If you’ve made it this far down the page I hope you’ll take the time to watch the short video. Perhaps this is the reason I’ve been impressed of late to write so many Holocaust themed stories. I plan to post my picture on Twitter and Facebook. When push comes to shove there is one race…THE HUMAN RACE #WeRemember

104 comments on “27 January 2017

    • Dear Cuzzin Notnek,

      And it seems that this photo has inspired a Nikolai except, not once, but twice. He’s a personal favorite of the author. Arguably the most complex character in the trilogy. To think he started out as Ulrich’s sidekick. But he’d have none of it.

      Thank you most kindly for bows and scalpels.

      Shalom,

      Cuzzin Shelley

      Liked by 2 people

  • I had someone do 1,195 words in my 200-word challenge last week which I didn’t read as I searched for the prompt and found no connection to it. I don’t normally do it, but I deleted the post.

    I know I have gone over 100 before, maybe as much as 120, but in the last few weeks that I have been playing again, I have managed to keep it below 100. It’s not easy, but that is half the fun of the challenge. Keeping in that count.

    Those pictures are fantastic. You never cease to stun me, Rochelle. You write great stories, and you create such wonderful images.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Dear Al,

      Thank you for the photo x2. I didn’t realize I’d used it before. Boy is my face red. Has this happened to you?
      1,195 is more than a bit over the top. And to have no connection to the prompt. I’ve deleted such as those before. I usually will send the errant writer an email. Occasionally it’s a misunderstanding, but I was once given a keyboard lashing and called a controlling b___.

      I will confess that when they start hitting 150-200 range I don’t read them.There are few rules in this challenge.

      Thank you for your comments re my story and artwork. 😀

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 2 people

      • I keep mine in a folder so I know which ones I have used before. They are all numbered and dated. I have used similar ones before.

        Being called a controlling ***** for telling the rules is very off. It’s the rules of the challenge.

        I tend not to read some when they go too far over the limit as well. I don’t have even a quarter of the participants you do, but I still have little time to read them all.

        Like

        • Reading them all is a challenge. Another confession. I used to read and comment on all of them. I’ve gotten more particular as the numbers have risen. For those who never comment on mine or are basically non-participants (post the story and run)…I return the favor. It sounds selfish, but I think you understand. 😉
          I do have a notebook where I’ve printed out all the stories. Although this one slipped by because I haven’t put the ones in that were book excerpts. Thanks for the supportive words, Al. It’s nice to have someone in my corner who understands.

          Liked by 1 person

          • When you take part in a challenge like this, it’s good to read some of the other stories. Even if it is just one or two. After all, reading 100 words won’t take long.

            I don’t think it’s selfish at all. Your time is precious to you.

            Liked by 1 person

        • Another interesting historical tale, Rochelle. But I must ask, was Nikolai the son or grandson?

          Some people just aren’t into anyone else’s rules. Even “show up on time for your shift” is a safely-ignored rule for some folks I’ve worked with. I was called a Nazi by one young man when I told him he had no business going behind the counter (fast food place) and helping himself to coffee when he was not on shift and out of uniform.

          Liked by 2 people

          • Dear Christine,

            It’s always a challenge to work an excerpt from a larger work into a stand-alone story. Nikolai is the son. The young one, Vasily, who’s portrait is the third down, is the grandson.

            I hated to be testy about rules and call me what you will, but to me blatantly going over the word limit is a bit self-indulgent.

            Thanks for the comment and the encouragement.

            Shalom,

            Rochelle

            Like

  • Great piece from your book, Rochelle. I’m wondering since this is a repeat prompt if we can use the same story we did before? Great idea about showing “I remember”. After seeing the horrible effects of war on TV we’ll all remember. Now some living in America are scared and many are having things forced on them that can ruin the planet. The government is going to try to breach sanctuary cities.The Obamas are starting a countrywide organization to encourage active participation in public affairs. —- Suzanne

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Suzanne,

      (Smacking forehead). I didn’t realize it was a repeat prompt. And I see that I used an excerpt about Nikolai before….at least it’s not the same one. Of course it’s fair to use the same story you used before. 😉

      “#WeRemember isn’t original with me but I’m going to participate.

      Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

    • Dear Loré,

      I was actually thinking about you this morning. Haven’t seen you for a few weeks and missed your presence.
      I’m pleased that you like both the writing and illustrations. That last line represents a lot more story. Something neither Nikolai nor Sergei will regret. Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Björn,

      I get emigrate and immigrate confused all the time. One is incoming the other is outgoing. I think immigrate is incoming. At any rate, I’m glad that we have such a forgiving group here. There’s a first time for everything, like the morning the prompt didn’t appear at all.
      Actually, Sergei isn’t exactly immigrating, but you’ll have to read AS ONE MUST, ONE CAN to find out why he’s never going back to Russia. 😉
      Enjoy your week. You will be missed.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • Aaaah, you’ve snagged the quintessential feel of the father/son disconnect. And I do love that last line. You can sense the shock it gives the son, and you can sense the determination to hope that is in the father. I hope that’s what you meant to convey because that’s what I got from it.

    And don’t apologize for speaking up about the 100 words. That’s part of the job you took on when you agreed to host this challenge, and if people don’t want to be reminded, they need to go write for a different challenge — or create their own. Personally, I would have written the one who called me a “b—-” and told him (or her) that unless he apologized publicly on this site, none of his stories would appear here again. But I don’t have as much grace as you.

    And — (don’t you just love all this unasked-for “advice”????) — don’t apologize for using the prompt another time. I can’t imagine a prompt being good for only one story. There must be a thousand stories in every picture. Now, I have to admit that sometimes I don’t get ideas that I like from a picture — or I don’t have time to think long enough about it — but it isn’t the picture’s fault.

    Anyway, you do a great job, Rochelle, and don’t take any backtalk. After all, you do have a life beyond FF, and you should be allowed to think about it sometimes instead of about all of us.

    Okay, I’m done now. Whew! I hope no one’s counting the comment words! 🙂

    Liked by 4 people

    • Dear Sandra,

      You do have a knack for writing overwhelming comments. Not a bad thing. No word limit for comments. 😉

      You absolutely went where I wanted to you to go with the scene. Sergei is a determined man in the face of Nikolai’s shock and consternation. Of course all will be explained in AS ONE MUST, ONE CAN.

      Fortunately, the exchange with the person who called me a controller, etc was behind the scenes via emails. At any rate he/she (don’t recall which) disappeared.
      At any rate, despite my rant about overage, it goes on. Irritating.

      Thank you for the support…and advice.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

    • Dear Dale,

      Can’t wait to hear where you are in the book now. In any event, I reran the prompt but not the story I did with it. Coincidentally, both stories were excerpt from AOMOC with Nikolai. I guess that photo puts me in mind of him. 😉

      Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • I get the feeling that last line is leading onto a world of pain for someone – or maybe just a huge row! Nice snippet and it shows their relationship very well – tetchy as we’d say here 🙂 Thank you for sharing the video too – it’s tragic that we haven’t learned from the War, that people are still dying, still being chosen for death because of their ethnicity or cultural group. Well done for helping to spread a positive message

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Lynn,

      This scene is definitely a lead in to something. 😉 Sergei and Nikolai haven’t had much of a relationship for 20 years beginning with a major disagreement. Sergei, a concert violinist, expected his son to choose a career in music. Instead Nikolai chose medicine. The reasons are revealed in the book

      I’ve already posted my “We Remember” photo in the inLinkz list and plan to post it Friday on Twitter and Facebook with hashtag. I hope to see tons of these pictures.

      Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

  • I just wanted to say that I also think you should have blocked the person that called you a B**** and you have every right to delete stories that go over the 100-word count! And I say this as someone who often goes over. If someone goes to 200 that is double the limit and I would understand you deleting their link off of the link-up page. It is a challenge, there are supposed to be rules.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Symanntha,

      Not to worry, the person who called me the name did so in a private email and never darkened the inLinkz again. As some do from time to time, that person was using the inLinkz list to draw traffic to his blog.

      As a rule I wouldn’t delete someone for going over the word limit, but I will pass on reading their work.

      Thank you for your understanding and support.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • A lovely story and great artwork – always a pleasure to see the characters come to life. Thanks for the link too. And I’m with you on the word count – 100 per cent. I might go two or three over but like you, when it’s way over the top I just move on. Keep up the fight!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Sandra,

      I’m so happy to have you in my corner. 😉 Although I’ve had some writers argue that they couldn’t possibly cut their precious stories down to 100 words, when they try it they find they can.

      Thank you for your kind words re my story and artwork.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • As I said, I cut and pasted this picture the first time around but never wrote a story so I say “Thanks” for the rerun. I love the father/son interaction in your story. And can feel Nikolai’s heart drop when his father says he’s not going back. As always, your drawings are exquisite and the video …. time to make a sign.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Lish,

      I hope you’ll read the book for the rest of the story. As often happens when the muse takes over, these two guys wrote a story I didn’t expect.

      I’ve made my sign. 😉 I put it on the linkz list already.

      This was a first for me..re-posting a photo, not realizing I’d used it before. Ironically, each time I used an excerpt from the 3rd book and each one was about Nikolai. Go figure. I’m glad the photo worked for you. 😀

      Thank you for your kind words.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • I’m glad you posted the photo again, because I couldn’t think of anything last time, and this time it inspired me. Thanks for the second chance!

    I enjoyed your “not exactly” excerpt. Just imagine what that early car must have looked like to people back then. Like some sort of space-age futuristic machine! I can see why some folks would have preferred walking: much safer!

    Liked by 1 person

  • That last line hit like an arrow to the heart of their relationship. I could only think Oh no poor Nikolai. The video you posted was very touching, I can not imagine what it must be like for those survivors to live in fear when it keeps happening.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Plaridel,

      Perhaps. However, Nikolai is a forty-year-old man who hasn’t spoken in twenty years. On top of that, Sergei, his father, is the one who rejected Nikolai for choosing medicine over music. Now after a twenty year standoff his father decides to walk back into his life.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

  • Dear Paulette,
    I like the photo you chose for your mug shot this week. Perhaps a side profile to go along with it would make a nice combo.

    Loved the title of the piece, and I can understand the son’s suspicion of his father’s motives. Sometimes asking for forgiveness–and granting it–can be difficult things, especially when pride gets in the way.

    Watch out for flying outhouses,
    Stevie

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Stevie,

      Smiling didn’t seem right for that mug shot. You’re right, it could use a profile. 😉

      I’m glad you caught the title. It is a foreshadow of what might be coming down the pike for this father and son. And both do have a lot of pride to swallow.

      Watching and ducking,

      Paulette

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Liz,

      In this case the son says it to the father. Nikolai is much more pragmatic than his gregarious father, Sergei. They are two of my favorites in the books…aside from Havah herself, of course.

      Thank you and Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • Thanks for your post. I enjoyed your story and the illustrations, too. What a touching video. It struck me especially given the current climate here. I’ve been following the news and trying to keep acting to do better. This video is a strong reminder of how we need to remember and need to keep those memories present in a real way.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Querida Rochelle,
    No doubt the stories will continue to blossom with your words. Beautifully told …
    The illustrations are primo art. 🎨
    Your video brought 3 words to mind “Lest we forget” … humanity has to be remembered and respected.
    I enjoyed seeing the repeat photograph. I’ve had a busy week reposting helps sometimes.
    Hope you enjoy my story again.
    Have a fabulous weekend, mi amiga. 😍
    Abrazos,
    Isadora 😎
    p.s. thank you for pointing out some FF blogs using lengthy writing. I’ve begun to skip those and was feeling guilty. Also, if a blog is read, the FF person should drop by even if to add a ‘Like’ Sorry … my rant. 😁😳

    Liked by 1 person

    • Querida Isadora,

      Your words are so appreciated.
      Re the lengthy stories…I pretty much skip them, too. For the longest time I haven’t said anything but lately I’ve mentioned it in comments. On a couple of occasions I’ve thrown the writer a challenge to take the story and pare it down and he has done it. Ah well, nuff said
      Glad you liked my story. If we every locate your wandering book, you’ll meet Nikolai and begin to understand my infatuation with him.

      Gracias y abrazos,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

  • As I recall ,this was the picture that lead to the story of Mrs. Junker and her nearly miraculous scrounging abilities. Hehehe! I went looking for that little story to repost, and ach, but it’s nowhere to be found. Hard to top it, though.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Rochelle, I refuse to call you crabby or controlling, however much you say I can. 🙂 Seriously though, it’s good you remind people, especially when it gets out of hand and any more than 101 is a different challenge.
    As usual a cracking piece of writing, I look forward to reading them each week.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Dear Rochelle

    I’m even more in love with Nikolai than I was before, now I’ve seen how dishy he is. It’s so clever the way you’ve got the family likeness there between the three generations. Such wonderful pictures. And I loved the excerpt. It worked very well as a standalone story.

    It’s funny how people, especially family members, sometimes think they can just waltz back into the life of a person from whom they’ve been estranged and buy their way back in, just in a second. I’m guessing that Nikolai’s father had been thinking about him for quite a while, but that Nikolai himself hadn’t given him a second thought and needed time to adjust to him arriving back in his life. …I will need to read the book, to find out more. It’s at the top of my “To Read” list on Goodreads, so won’t be long. I’m halfway through another book, which I’ve not yet added to my current reading shelf, plus I have to review a book I’ve already read. This is obviously going to be a year when I’m behind with everything, unless I manage to give myself a kick up my own backside!

    That video is so moving and powerful. This world really can be hell on earth at times. I reckon that horrors have happened throughout history, but it alarms me that barbarism still lurks at the heart of humanity, beneath all our accrued knowledge that should make us better people.

    I must send you some photos to add to your FF stock. By the way, I never wrote a story the first time you posted this week’s photo prompt, so it was new to me.

    All best wishes
    Sarah

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Sarah,

      Since you’ve read the first two books you know there’s no love lost between Nikolai and his father and some of the reasons. In the next book I had fun expounding on yeas of misunderstanding. But, then, I don’t want to give too much away. 😉

      Thank you for all your comments. I’m always open to new photos.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

      • Dear Rochelle,
        I’m very much looking forward to further revelations about those years, but I’ll have to do a bit of revision in advance, as I remember some of the stuff about that relationship in your other two books but I want to check that I remember all of them, or do you recap in Book 3? I have difficulty sometimes reading about relationships with fathers and so occasionally things I read on the subject get unremembered quickly D:
        I’ll sort out some FF photos for you this next week.
        All best wishes,
        Sarah

        Liked by 1 person

        • Dear Sarah,

          I pretty much recap what I’ve said in the prior two books since, at that time, I didn’t intend to bring Nikolai’s father back into his life. Sergei had other plans. In the third book you’ll find out what precipitated the rift between them in greater detail. I’m not sure I mentioned it much in the first book at all actually.
          I’ll leave the rest up to you. 😉

          Shalom,

          Rochelle

          Liked by 1 person

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