11 October 2013

Published October 9, 2013 by rochellewisoff

WELCOME TO FRIDAY FICTIONEERS. 

As always, writers are encouraged to be as innovative as possible with the prompt and 100 word constraints. 

Henry David Thoreau said it best.

“It’s not what you look at that matters, it’s what you see.”

THE CHALLENGE:

Write a one hundred word story that has a beginning, middle and end. (No one will be ostracized for going a few words over the count.)

THE KEY:

Make every word count.

THE RULES:

  • Copy your URL to the Linkz collection. You’ll find the tab following the photo prompt. It’s the little white box to the left with the blue froggy guy. Click on it and follow directions. This is the best way to get the most reads and comments.
  • MAKE SURE YOUR LINK IS SPECIFIC TO YOUR FLASH. (Should you find that you’ve made an error you can delete by clicking the little red ‘x’ that should appear under your icon. Then re-enter your URL. (If there’s no red x email me at Runtshell@aol.com. I can delete the wrong link for you).
  • While our name implies “fiction only” it’s perfectly Kosher to write a non-fiction piece as long as it meets the challenge of being a complete story in 100 words. 
    • ***PLEASE MAKE NOTE IN YOUR BLOG IF  YOU PREFER NOT TO RECEIVE CONSTRUCTIVE CRITICISM.*** 
    • REMINDER: This page is “FRIDAY FICTIONEERS CENTRAL” and is NOT the place to promote political or religious views. Also, you are responsible for the content of your story and policing comments on your blog. You have the right to delete any you consider offensive.

    **Please exercise DISCRETION when commenting on a story! Be RESPECTFUL.**

    Should someone have severe or hostile differences of opinion with another person it’s my hope that the involved parties would settle their disputes in private.

  • Like us on Facebook
  • ;) My story follows the photo and link tool. I enjoy honest comments and welcome constructive criticism. :D
  • Shalom,

              Rochelle

Copyright - Sandra Crook

Copyright – Sandra Crook

get the InLinkz code

Genre: Historical Fiction

Word Count: 99

ROSE OF SHARON

            Annetta’s blonde hair, blue eyes, and well-turned figure kept her alive for the worst part of two years at Ravensbrück.

            A year after the liberation, she accepted an invitation from Gershom, a Treblinka survivor, to join him and his friends in Palestine.

            At Kibbutz Ein HaNatziv they planted olive trees. Amid the date palms Annetta felt her spirit revive.

            One day while strolling through Beit She’an’s ancient ruins, Gershom led her to sit on one of the amphitheater’s stone steps and then knelt. “Marry me.”

            “You’d marry a…whore?”

            “No…you…” With calloused hands he caressed her cheeks. “…are altogether lovely.”

.

.

.

For the history behind my pound of fiction click here.

                                   

Ancient amphitheater in Beit She'an, Israel.  Copyright- Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

Ancient amphitheater in Beit She’an, Israel.
Copyright- Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

Founders of Kibbutz Ein HaNatziv- 1946

Founders of Kibbutz Ein HaNatziv- 1946

89 comments on “11 October 2013

    • Dear David,

      As I’ve come to an age where my personal memories are written in history books, I’ve come to appreciate history more. Honestly, when I was a in school I slept through history and social studies classes. Guess I’m making up for lost time and learning all I can. If I’ve taught someone else along the way, so much the better.
      Thank you for your affirming comments.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

    • Dear Helena,

      Incomprehensible that such things actually happened, isn’t it? I cried when I read the article, too. Heaven help us when we read such things and feel nothing. Thank you for your kind words, darling. 😉

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • Moving story, and moving history. I love the way you craft such moving stories, and then tell us what it stems from. As a Jewish mother, I got this, and was touched anyway… but the history is fascinating. That first line: “Annetta’s blonde hair, blue eyes, and well-turned figure kept her alive for the worst part of two years at Ravensbrück,” is gorgeous, and really packs a punch!

    Like

    • Sad what some had to do to survive – and then live with themselves afterword. I remember reading Exodus when it came out. That was the first I knew of the holocaust. My parents never talked about it. I remember thinking that I would have survived cause I was so cute, being so naive at the time that I did not realise what it really meant, me with my green eyes and chestnut hair… Lovely story.

      Like

      • Dear Lindaura,

        It’s funny how some parents swept everything under the rug while others, like mine, made sure that we’d never forget. Incidentally, one of my aunts was a blue-eyed blonde. Thank you coming by with your comments. You made me smile.

        Shalom,

        Rochelle

        Like

    • Dear Ann,

      Of course she wasn’t. Thank you for your insightful comments. I agree the link is horrible…horrible because it’s true. The truth of it is that Annetta most likely would’ve been used up and killed.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

      • My views might be radical, but I believe those poor women did the honourable thing of striving to stay alive. I think all prostitutes are victims, actually, even those who say they like doing it for reasons a/b/c. There was a TV series a while back, about a ‘high-class’ ‘call girl’, starring Billie Piper, which glamourised the sex ‘business’. It made me really angry. Ann

        Like

    • Dear Danny,

      I can receive no greater compliment. I’m happy to pass on the knowledge that I gain through research. Thank you for your kind words. And of course Annetta has done nothing wrong.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • Dear Rochelle,

    Your story melted my sparkly heart. Sometimes the love of another changes our entire history. We forget who we were and become more than we ever expected to be. That love can come from someone else, or it can even be when we find that love within ourselves. Thank you for a wonderful story.

    Love,
    Renee

    Like

  • I love a happy ending. One never knows what one will do under certain circumstances. The will to survive is strong. I also love the history lessons as I never paid much attention in class either. Now it’s much more interesting. I love learning.

    Like

    • Dear Jackie,

      With more of my personal memories ensconced in the current history books, I find myself wanting to know more. I can’t imagine what I would do under similar circumstances. Terrifying. Glad you liked my story.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • Well, I finally tried out writing for this. Several of the folks I follow had been encouraging. Hope I did it correctly–please let me know.
    Your story takes my breath.

    Like

  • Okay, I am probably being dense, but I don’t see the timing in any of the instructions I can find right now. I thought this competition closed sometimes on Sunday. But I am uncertain.

    Is it still open? If so, I finally wrote something, but didn’t want to enter when I was not sure of the timing.

    Like

  • dear Rochelle, sitting here crying…what a wonderful story. Thanks for the link to the article in “Spiegel online”, I found it in German then. Again one of those things that are forgotten as long as somebody comes and digs them out…

    Like

  • Dear Rochelle,
    it´s the same for me – I am very happy you answered on my comment…
    maybe it´s the chance for us, who are born after ww2, to break down fences. We can meet peacefully and with love and respect for each other.
    Liebe Grüße
    Carmen

    Like

  • Dear Rochelle

    A truly uplifting story. I love the things I learn from your knowledge and research.

    A dark, horrific time that blighted generations on both sides of the conflict for vastly differing reasons. The world must never forget that mankind is capable of such utter evil. It still goes on under a different name.

    Take care

    Dee

    Like

    • Dear Dee,

      It is horrifying to see what mankind is capable of. And just when you think you’ve heard them all and it couldn’t get any worse, another comes along to prove you wrong.

      In any case, I’m glad you’re back and that you liked my story. Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

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