14 March 2014

Published March 12, 2014 by rochellewisoff

WELCOME TO FRIDAY FICTIONEERS and HAPPY “BIG ONE” TO JANET WEBB! 

Seize the opportunity to free your muse and allow her take you on a magic carpet ride. 

Henry David Thoreau said it best.

“It’s not what you look at that matters, it’s what you see.”

THE CHALLENGE:

Write a one hundred word story that has a beginning, middle and end. (No one will be ostracized for going a few words over the count.)

THE KEY:

MAKE – EVERY – WORD – COUNT

THE RULES:

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     THOSE WRITING HISTORICAL FICTION (MYSELF INCLUDED): While WIKIPEDIA is usually a decent source of information, it’s not always a reliable one. As a rule, I use it as a jumping off point to other research threads. In any case it’s a good idea to use more than one source. I speak with the voice of experience when I say that even a simple 100 word story can bring serious repercussions.  

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  • Shalom,

              Rochelle  

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The following story is dedicated to Lucile Wilson, Doris Wullschleger and Grace Cowling, three  special ladies who gave of their time to a group of girls known as Troop 499.  They had a lot to do with who I am today. 

Genre: Historical Fiction

Word Count: 100        

TRAIL OF THE TREFOIL

            “What on earth are you doing, child?”

            Twelve-year-old Rose read Papa’s upside-down lips and said, “I’m using my head.”   

            “Surely, that’s not what Miss Daisy meant.”

            “Surely it is, Papa. Yesterday at Girl Scouts she stood on her head.”  

            “Rosy-Posy, you’re a delicate little girl.” 

            “Miss Daisy says I can do anything I set my mind to.” Rose lowered her one leg, planted her foot on the carpet and reached for her crutch. “I’m going to be a doctor.”

            “Remember, you’re also deaf.”

            “So’s Miss Daisy. She says all that means is that she never hears anyone tell her ‘no’.”      

           

Center: Juliette "Daisy" Gordon Low-The founder of Girl Scouts in America

Center: Juliette “Daisy” Gordon Low-The founder of Girl Scouts in America

Daisy was an amazing lady. Here’s a bit of history to whet your appetite.         

Girl Scout Trefoil

Girl Scout Trefoil

Troop 499-Can you find me?

Troop 499-Can you find me?

*Final Note: Juliette Low held the first Girl Guide (later Girl Scouts) meeting at her house in Savannah, GA on March 12, 1912.  The troop had 18 members divided into two patrols named the Carnation and the White Rose. 

130 comments on “14 March 2014

    • Dear Chris,

      For you to say so speaks volumes to me. We had some great times even though I could never remember my permission slip. 😉 Even better is finding you, Lucy and Margo again and finding that we have more than history and scouting in common. 😉
      Troop 499 will always hold a special place in my heart.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • A lovely, strong story that speaks volumes. Thank goodness for people like Miss Daisy.
    We don’t have girl scouts in Ireland, but most scout troops are mixed, boys and girls. I was a sea scout and have great memories of that time.

    Like

    • Dear Sarah,

      Girl Scouts started as Girl Guides here in the States. In fact, as we write, March 12 is the 102nd anniversary of the first meeting in Miss Daisy’s home in Savannah, Georgia.
      Thank you for coming by with your sweet words.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • Beautiful story and inspirational words! I loved how she ‘read the upside down lips’, then a few lines down you realise both why they’re upside down and why she’s reading them. Nice slow reveal! I also see you’ve gone for something more literal this week after last week’s post… unless I’ve missed something again haha…!

    Like

    • Dear Jessie,

      Glad you caught the upside down lips. You didn’t miss anything. Actually I tend to be more literal. Last week was a bit of an experiment for me. At least 8 times out of 10 I go for historical fiction.
      Thank you for your lovely comments.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • Dear Rochelle

    I was a Brownie and then a Girl Guide, seems a lifetime away, but your lovely story brought back the promise I made all those years ago

    ‘I promise on my honour,
    ‘To do my best to do my duty
    To God and the Queen,
    To help other people every day
    Especially those at home’

    I guess it’s changed by now, but I always felt pride when we all recited it at the start of each meeting.

    I love Miss Daisy and the line …she never hears anyone tell her ‘no’ is just brilliant..

    Well done and thanks Rochelle

    Take care

    Dee

    Like

    • Dear Dee,

      “On my honor, I will try:
      To do my duty to God and my country,
      To help other people at all times,
      And to obey the Girl Scout laws”

      That’s what it was here. A long time ago. So many good memories. Girl scouts started as Girl Guides when Miss Daisy brought the concept from England. So I have your country and Lord and Lady Baden-Powell to thank.

      Glad you liked it.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • Good morning, Rochelle, or at least “morning”, as I write from a land covered with new snow, but thankfully, not as much as they predicted. I love the idea that being deaf means never having to hear them say “no” and greatly enjoyed your story as always. I was a Campfire Girl myself. 🙂

    janet

    Like

    • Dear Janet.

      What can I say? I love history. Mrs. Low was an amazing woman. She really was deaf and, according to all accounts, assertive. Glad you enjoyed.

      Don’t worry. Some of my best friends were Campfire girls. 😉

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • Hi Rochelle,
    Inspirational and life-affirming story. Very appropriate timing with the para-olympics going on in Sochi. Also coincides with girl scout cookie sales. My wife was a girl scout, a counselor at a girl scout summer camp, and her mother was a girl scout executive in Tulsa. You always seem to find great themes for your stories. Ron

    Like

    • Dear Ron,

      The funny thing about all those coincidences is that I wasn’t thinking of any of them. 😉 When I chose the prompt the first thing I thought of was hiking which I’d never have gotten to do had it not been for Girl Scouts. Then my research path led to Juliette Gordon Low, a most fascinating individual. And I had no idea that March 12 was the 102nd anniversary of the first Girl Guides meeting in America.
      I’m really pleased that you liked my story and took the time to swing by with your affirming comments.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

    • Dear Brain,

      I schedule mine ahead and then wait until it’s actually live before linking. I don’t think it would work the other way around because you’d be sending us to an empty link. I look forward to reading your story.

      Welcome and shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • Sebastian hears the word “no” and translates it into “time to do the same thing again with a big grin on your face” – but you have taken the flip side of a refusal to be held back, and I enjoyed it. Good for Rose, knowing that she is deaf not delicate and very fitting during a time when we hear about great feats from the “disabled” paralympians in Russia.

    Like

    • Dear Jennifer,

      I love your take on Sebastian’s translation of “no”. I remember that look three times over.

      I really had no particular timing for this story. It seems that the stars aligned just at the right moment. 😉

      I suspect there are Rose’s who’ve been inspired directly or indirectly by Miss Daisy and have gone on to do great things after being told they couldn’t.

      I’m happy you enjoyed this. 😀

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • Great tribute to a worthwhile group – and at cookie time, too! I’m sure that was intentional. You are in the second row, second from left. You look just the same. Impish and curious.

    Like

  • What a sweet and inspiring story. I especially appreciated the history on Miss Daisy. Unfortunately, when I was in Girl Scouts, I don’t remember ever learning about her. Then again, the only thing I do remember from those years is burning my wrist on my buddy burner at camp. Still have that scar 🙂

    Like

    • Dear Adelie,

      Ouch, I can see where scouting is a painful memory for you. 😉

      I remember our scout leader telling us the story of how Juliette Gordon Low brought the concept of scouting to America after meeting Lord Baden-Powell. But it wasn’t until following the research trail that I learned what an assertive and dynamic person she was.

      Thank you for your comments and, again, welcome to Friday Fictioneers.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

    • Dear Björn,

      As I’ve mentioned in comments before, Lord Baden-Powell was Juliette Gordon Low’s influence for Girl Scouts. So I am grateful to the both of them for a wonderful childhood experience. 😉

      Thank you and Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • Aww weren’t you a cute little curly haired girl! I know it’s you with all those curls. 🙂
    I never joined the girl scouts as my mother thought it was a waste of time. More like she didn’t want to be bothered. But I love girl scout cookies! Especially the mint ones. 😉 hahahaha. Great story as usual. I learnt something new today too, which is a bonus.

    Like

    • Dear Jackie,

      Curls? What curls? Yes, that’s me. Special times, those. I think part of my mother’s reason for letting me participate is as a babysitter. My mom worked full time back in the day when most mothers were at home. Ah well, that’s another story for another time. And when it came to selling cookies I was the worst. 😉

      Glad you liked my story.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • When my now 30 something daughter was a child I was her brownie/girl scout leader along with (at one time) 13 of her friends. This month was always important to us as it is girl scout month and women’s history month. I tried to instill a sense of pride into my girls for being women and who they are. I don’t know if I succeeded but every now and then one will call me out on facebook and remember a time we spent together.

    Like

    • Dear Dawn,

      By the fact that your girls call you out speaks volumes in how much you succeeded. Through facebook, I’ve reconnected with all three of my leaders’ daughters who were also classmates from kindergarten on. Now we share pictures of grandchildren.
      I doff my beanie to you with utmost gratitude and respect that you took the time to be one of those very special people. Thank you for sharing.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • Bravo! Another well written piece of historical fiction, and another fascinating piece of real history. The dialogue was perfect here, Rochelle. It really makes the entire story come alive. Happily, I bought my caché of gs cookies last week! There were a few Tresfoils in there. 🙂

    Like

    • Dear Dawn,

      I’m pleased that you liked. I always look forward to your comments. I learned a lot in writing. I love it when a research thread takes me to new places. Even though I knew Juliette Gordon Low was the GS founder, I never knew what a dynamic person she was. Bon apetit. Enjoy your cookies. 😉

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • I too have fond memories of being a Girl Scout. One and two week Girl Scout camp in the summer was the bomb. In the 1970s there were not a lot of activities for young girls and scouting was the answer. My daughter was a girl scout too but with a poorly organized, inactive troop and so many other opportunities for a young girls time, she didn’t stay with it. It sounds like you experience was wonderful.

    Like

    • Dear Maryann,

      So many good memories for me came from scouting. Troop 499 started when we were in the second grade. We stayed together until 6th grade. I guess by then the leaders, who to me were goddesses, decided they’d had enough. I joined another troop but didn’t stay with it. It just wasn’t the same.

      I’m glad your experience was positive, too. Sorry about your daughter’s.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • …just wandered over here through Bjorn and his Friday stories. I might give it a try this week. Your story of Juliette Low hit home with me. I went to Camp Juliana, named for her,
    in Battleground WA. Many good memories from the late 50’s , early 60’s – I remember we put candles in little paper boats we let go down the river one evening. The songs, girls, learning to be an well rounded human being and more, priceless.

    Like

    • Dear Katy,

      Welcome! Your handle reminds me of the song that I now have playing in my head. 😉

      GS camp is a nice part of my memories, too. I’m pleased that my story triggered some good ones for you, too.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • I love that last line of yours! That’s perfect. I think that’s the proper attitude all right. These pictures are precious and, no, I can’t find you. Oh where are you? I hope you’ll tell me. Great story, I really enjoyed. I was in Girl Scouts for only a brief time, but I really enjoyed Brownies!

    Like

    • Dear EL,

      I’ve really missed you.

      From all accounts, Miss Daisy was not only deaf, but assertive and obstinate as well. She used her hearing loss to her advantage.

      Glad you enjoyed my story. 😀

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

    • Dear Liz,

      I don’t think we ever crossed that bridge. I do remember a few hikes though where bridges were involved. I was terrified, too. In any case the prompt just put me in mind of those wonderful hikes with scouts.

      Glad you liked the story.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • Another entrtaining and heartwarming story coloured and textured by history. And you haven’t changed a bit. Second from the left, second row, right? I was in the Brownies for a while, but we moved so much as a family that continuation of anything outside of breathing was difficult to factor in! Ann

    Like

    • Dear Ann,

      Most people nail me without a second thought when it comes to childhood pictures. I consider it a compliment.

      I guess you could say my roots go deep. With the exception of three of the girls in the photo, I’ve reconnected with each one in my adult years. Six of them are facebook friends. I knew kids who moved around a lot and envied them. In retrospect I can’t imagine how hard that would’ve been.

      Glad you liked the story. Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

      • A friend from 30 years ago googled me a while back and recognised my mug online. Moving around made it impossible to form long-term friendships and as a perpetual ‘new girl on the block’, I was targeted by bullies. They soon regretted it, :), but I don’t think I came away unscathed. Then, nobody comes away unscathed from life! 🙂

        Like

  • Dear Babette,
    I want you to know, after I left the conference last Saturday I stopped at the Walmart Market next door and Girl Scouts had a tent set up selling cookies. naturally, I could not pass without buying 3 boxes. I really enjoyed this story, and I’m loving your book (even if I do get teary-eyed on some of the stories). Thanks for another history lesson.
    Cousin Leroy

    Like

    • Dear Leroy,

      You’re not the first who’s been inspired to buy GS cookies. It makes me wonder if I shouldn’t have written GS stories as a kid to promote sales. As it was I didn’t do too well as a door to door cookie salesgirl. At any rate I’m pleased you like my story. I had a blast with the research. Daisy is my new hero.

      It really makes me happy that you’re enjoying my book. I only hope that you’re not getting teary-eyed on the ones meant to be humorous. 😉 Feel free to pass the word. It would be nice to actually sell books this year. I mean it’s fun having big box of them in my car but…

      Shalom,

      Babette

      Like

  • learned something more about the Girl Scouts besides their cookie sales every year. 🙂 i enjoyed your story, the brief history on Daisy and your personal photograph. so cute!!

    Like

    • Dear Sun,

      I’m much better at telling stories than I was at selling cookies. 😉 I was the utmost worst in my troop. When it comes to flowers I was something of a shrinking violet in the sales department.
      I’m pleased you like my ramblings and my photo.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • Every week,since I started writing for FF,your entry has been the first I read Rochelle-sometimes even before I post mine-this week,i felt like the lil girl in your lovely piece-looking at things upside down-kind of-starting from the bottom and slowly working my way up ;-)Coming to your story-loved the attitude of Miss Daisy and how she influenced lil Rosy’s life-great determination and a wonderful way to foster confidence in young kids,even if they are differently able:-)Thank you for sharing this with us and yes,I could immediately recognize the cute lil you in the pic-you still look the same 😀

    Like

    • Dear Atreyee,

      You’re very kind. I’m pleased that you like my stories, including this one. There’s nothing more encouraging for me as a writer to know that something I wrote touched another person. Admittedly I’m pretty easy to spot in that picture and take it as a compliment. 😉
      Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

      • As you should-you are really pretty-had I not known I would have thought you are at least a decade younger than you say you are:-)Yes,I do enjoy your writing-you have a uncanny talent of making your readers involved and I love that Rochelle:-)

        Like

  • Strong use of dialogue and action. Thank you for eschewing the temptation to tell the reader the inner workings of the characters. You wrote a beautiful story and trusted the reader to bring their own emotional response and judgment, and the story was the fuller for it. Bravo.

    Like

  • Dear Rochelle,
    You are so multi-talented and thank you so much for all the work and effort you put into this venture. I enjoy this so each week! Thank you for all the memories you dredge up – good ones. I was a no-luck girl scout going from house to house when I was was young. Then my friends and I decided to go up the hill to the U of A campus and see if we could sell some to the students. BINGO! we hit the jackpot! Sold out of all the boxes each year from then on and went to the fraternities which were even bigger spenders. Wow, my boys said some brownies came to their house and bought everything their den mother could haul over there. It was wonderful – I won a jar of jelly beans and this was in 1960. Good memories Rochelle. And, your story this week is so much fun! Thanks for all the help and advice. You know, you were cute as a button in your girls scout dress too. My sister and I had 3 years of bliss in the early sixties (my favorite time of childhood!). My husband is going to give me a remedial class on proper etiquette on computers (answering correctly to the real person who sent me input.) Thanks Rochelle, Nan

    Like

    • Dear Nan,

      Etiquette shmetiquette. I thoroughly enjoyed your comment. Your compliments encourage me and make me smile.

      Sounds like we were in scouts somewhere around the same era. Too bad I didn’t know you then. 😉 Oh well, sales were just never my thing. I did love the thin minds, but then who doesn’t?

      I’m pleased that my story dredged up good memories for you. 😀

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • This is so inspiring and really really sweet- the kind of story that finds its way to one’s heart and stays for an infinite period of time. Thank you for this lovely piece and for Rosie-Posie 🙂

    Like

  • Such a wonderful story and I love the last line. I’m sure Rosy went on to be a doctor and do other great things. As someone who could never stand on their head the image of one-legged Rosy doing it will never leave me.

    Like

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