2 October 2015

Published September 30, 2015 by rochellewisoff

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The following photo is the PHOTO PROMPT.  Does it download a story to your head. Tell us in a hundred words or less–beginning, middle and and end. 

NOTE: We have experienced some technical difficulty with the inLinkz box. It was in the middle of an update at the most inconvenient time. PLEASE for future reference, if you’re experiencing a difficulty with the site EMAIL ME! I’m as close as runtshell@gmail.com. Thank you. 

Shalom, 

Rochelle

PHOTO PROMPT - © Marie Gail Stratford

PHOTO PROMPT – © Marie Gail Stratford

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Genre: Historical Friction

Word Count: 100

TRASH 80

            “Isn’t it beautiful?” Jan showed off his latest acquisition from Radio Shack.

            I fumed. “Our electric typewriter works just fine. A computer will end up being another dust collector like your precious Polaroid SX-70.”

            “How was I supposed to know the film would cost a fortune?”         

***

            Thirty-six years have passed since that day.  I’ve acquired my own desktop, scanner-printer combo, a netbook for travel and Jan takes sharp pictures with his iPad.  

            He reads my story over my shoulder and says with a sly smile, “Lemme get a rag for you.”

            “Why?”

            “You’ve been at it hours. You’re collecting dust.”

.

.

.

trs-80

SONY DSC

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netbook

149 comments on “2 October 2015

    • Dear Irene,

      I’m the same way. I didn’t list them all. By the late 80’s it became necessary for me to have my own computer for my writing and internet. We were among the first to sign up for AOL. Before that my son was on a bulletin board group on the Commodore. And we used think Atari was innovative.

      Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 2 people

  • I remember the old golf-ball typewriter being thought of as fairly innovative, then our company invested in ‘screen-typers’ which gave way to computers which gave way…. oh stop me… And yes, I fell for the polaroid thing – nasty sticky photos. Thanks for the trip down memory lane, make sure Jan doesn’t get too rough with that duster. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Sandra,

      When my mom bought an IBM electric typewriter I thought that was high tech. It was bigger than a Humvee. when Jan brought home that Trash 80 I was ready to spit nails. We could hardly afford shoes for the boys and he just had to have the latest tech toys. Techtosterone, I call it. 😉 But now it’s hard to say who’s surpassed whom in technical toys.

      Thank you for commenting on my Memory Lane Tour. If you could leave a few pennies for the bus driver, she’d appreciated it.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

  • Nice slice of life there–really captures the evolution of technology. My dad taught me to program in Basic on a TRS-80 so this really brought back a fond memory. We were the first ones in town with a personal computer. These days the latest gadget changes faster than you can charge your smart phone. I feel old. 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Karen,

      I know what you mean. I remember when a friend of ours spent over a $100 for a Texas Instruments calculator. That was cutting edge. Now you can get them at the checkouts for pennies. Or even free as special offers. Our big purchase after the Trash 80 was the Commodore 64, complete with Koala pad. I suspect I have a few years on you. 😉

      Thank you for visiting and commenting.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Patrick,

      We have a basement and garage full of relics. We even have two Kaypro computers which I fondly refer to as “Commodore in a Can.” Perhaps we should pool our resources and open a museum.
      Women’s work? 😯 Careful, sir.

      Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

  • Ooh, ooh, the memories! Lovely story, Rochelle, one that rings true with many of us older ones, I’m sure. I typed my thesis and that of my SO on one of these electrical typewriter monsters. Images had to be drawn with ink. Chapters had to be rearranged by literal cutting and pasting… I programmed my statistical tests to run on a pocket calculator… and then the department where I worked got a computer, a plotter, and a computer-like contraption called word processor. I never looked back. 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Misskzebra,

      I can’t imagine why Polaroids would even be deemed necessary. But then Instagram is lost on me. iPhones seem to work well and iPads even better.

      Thank you for visiting and commenting.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

    • Dear Caerlynn,

      I never dreamed when Jan brought that first computer home where it would lead. Now I can’t imagine my life without my own PC. Heaven forbid that he and I would share. 😉 It’s a lot like having my own car which is also a must.

      Thank you for reading and commenting.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Alicia,

      I know what you mean about computers in the 70’s. In the early part of the decade our high school had a data processing class. The computer filled the room. Who knew it would lead to this wonderful desktop that I’m typing on. On the desk is my iPhone lying next to my iPad. One good power outage will destroy my happy existence. 😉
      I hadn’t really thought of this as history, but I guess it really is.

      Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

  • Oh the memories here. It seems we went from “big chief tablets” and pencils to “oh my” in weeks. You could hardly keep up. I still have the Kaypro (X2), Commodore and who knows what else. We had the latest, greatest, printers that could print an entire page in only 30 minutes. Lol. I was a member of the Commodore Users Group. On, and on. Thanks for the flashback. Wonderful story. Now get back to work before I have to dust off the last 20 minutes of dust……..

    Liked by 1 person

  • I was just mentioning to someone yesterday about getting my first computer, which I only wanted for word processing. When we used to go to work with my dad when we were little, the computers took up an entire room and the guys would give us punch cards or make a banner for us. My how things have changed. Of course, they’re changing as we speak. I’m glad people don’t get redundant as quickly as technology (or at least I hope we don’t.)

    janet

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Janet,

      My first computer that I had all to myself was a Leading Edge, not to mention I had my own dot matrix printer and floppy disk drive. Now I have about 500 poems saved to those disks. Not sure how to access them. We also had a zip drive.
      How quickly our tech toys become obsolete. Anyone with an iPhone knows this. 😉

      Thanks for stopping by to reminisce with me. 😀

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • Dear Rochelle,

    I know this story!

    We have a closet. It is full. His first computer was pulled out of the box and promptly dismantled and then put back together again, and again, and again! Each time with new and better added, and the old parts stored in the closet. I can’t complain too much… over the years he kept my classroom supplied with many computers for my students to learn on; sometimes when other classrooms had none. 😉

    Shalom,
    Lynda

    PS: And yes, he did try to convince me to get one too, but I just held onto my word processor until it was stolen from our home. It was then that I finally made the switch.

    Like

    • Dear Lynda,

      I’ll see your closet and raise you a sub-basement and a garage. My husband throws nothing away. And of course we’ve upgraded many many times since the old TRS 80. And we did have a word processor, too. Although I can’s say my husband dismantled his computers. 😉
      I love the way everyone is relating to my story. i really enjoy getting this kind of feedback.

      Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

  • Haha! My, how the world has changed! I remember the “Trash 80.” I remember thinking computers were just expensive toys. “Who really needs one?” Now I spend all day on a computer. *sigh* We were so naive back then. Great story, Rochelle, with a zippy last line. I enjoyed the trip down memory lane.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Eric,

      I wondered if anyone would pick up on my title. I don’t really remember too much about ours. I had little to do with computers until we sank a small fortune into the Commodore 64 with dot matrix printer and Koala pad. Woohoo. We were uptown. Like you, a good percentage of my day is spent in front of the computer.

      Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 2 people

  • Great story! We still have my big investment for college…a used Toshiba laptop at the bargain price of $1000 with Windows 95. It makes a great paperweight these days. Amazing what changes in the span of one’s lifetime. I wonder if they will let kids calculate by hand when my kids get to school, as opposed to being required to do so, as we were.

    Like

  • Rochelle,
    When you write about Jan it is so obvious why your marriage works – both in the love you have for him and in the way he is in himself. What a beautiful tribute and what a lovely way of (not quite) saying I told you so!
    Jen

    Liked by 1 person

  • The perfect true story to match my photo! I love this, Rochelle. This slice of life reminds me of a few conversations between Conja and myself. (Anytime Jan wants to come and rummage through her boxes of cables and electronic parts, he has my permission.)

    Peace,
    MG

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Nan,

      We shared a computer for a while but our youngest son was always on it. Then (after son left home) I discovered my passion for writing. It was then we felt the need to be a two computer family. The Commodore 64 was a great game machine. Hm. Whatever happened to joysticks?

      Thank you for sharing your memories.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

  • The first paragraph made me smile. Polaroid film was very expensive, wasn’t it?
    Back when I was little, I knew for sure that people like me would never own a computer so I drew a keyboard on a box and jabbed at it :-). Then a couple of years later, along came the Sinclair ZX80…

    Nice bit of nostalgia!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Ali,

      I had no idea with that Trash 80 what the future would hold. I really was upset with my husband’s purchase. By the time we spent a small fortune on the Commodore 64 I was on board. I’m happy my story made you smile.

      Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

  • Historical Friction – I like that 🙂

    Again a great tale (told predominantly in dialogue) – and clearly echoing your personal memories. I like the way it shows not only the change in technology, but the change in how we feel about technology.

    I remember mocking people for having a mobile phone…as if it were the weirdest thing in the world. Now I’ve checking my blog stats whenever Ive a free moment :).

    Cheers
    KT

    Liked by 1 person

  • Good story, Rochelle. I did without a computer for some years after moving to India. I had it , but it sat on a shelf, unconnected. Finally I decided to buy a laptop. Then I bought a printer/scanner combination. Maybe some day I’ll buy a new camera. Little by little I’m updating. 🙂 — Suzanne

    Liked by 1 person

  • Such a fun and lovely story, Rochelle! Your husband sounds like a keeper. And I loved reading about your love affair with technology. The idea of a person sitting and writing, and collecting dust was hilarious.
    Oh, and I really, really enjoyed everyone’s comments, and your wonderful, varied responses.
    You teach us all in more ways than you know.

    Like

    • Dear Vijaya,

      Your words fill me with warmth and smiles. One of the things I love about this group is the exchange of comments and stories. I’ve enjoyed this one in particular. Our experiences are certainly varied. Some of us remember more than others since we have more to remember. 😉

      As for my husband, after nearly 44 years, he’s definitely a keeper. He’s never come up and dusted me off but he’s threatened to have my computer cable surgically implanted.

      Thank you,

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

  • Our very first computer was a Tandy from Radio Shack (Canada) purchased in 1987 when I went back to university!
    Until very recently, it was still in our possession, collecting dust.
    As do I!
    Thoroughly enjoyed your story.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Indira,

      This seems to be the story that everyone can relate to in one way or another. It stands to reason since this group wouldn’t exist without computers and the internet. 😉

      Thank you for you lovely comments as always.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

  • A universal story for everyone of a certain age. My kids laugh at Tom’s description of the main frame computer at the University that filled an entire room in the early 1980’s. Now we carry a computer 1000 times more powerful in our pocket.
    As always, thanks for hosting,
    Tracey

    Like

    • Dear Tracey,

      In the early 70’s my high school had a data processing class. That computer filled the classroom. I didn’t take that class, I was next door in the graphic arts class learning photo lithography learning to burn plates and do color separations. All obsolete thanks to scanners and graphics programs.

      The times they are a-changing….

      As always, hosting this diverse community is my pleasure and passion. Happy to have you as a part of it.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

  • Dusty Rita,
    This story demonstrates the great foresight and vision of husbands everywhere. I love the way Jan persevered through the verbal abuse and negative attitude of those adverse to change. He is a true hero and champion. My hat’s off to him.
    Sincerely,
    Goofy (new mayor-elect, Nasal Falls, WI)

    Like

    • Dear Mayor-Elect Goofy,

      Congrats on the new position. I’ve always suspected the village idiots were the ones involved in politics. I will agree about Jan being a hero. It’s why I keep him around. 😉

      Shalom,

      Dusty Rita

      Like

    • Dear Weebee

      First, welcome to Friday Fictioneers. I read your story. Disturbing as was the event you wrote about. Nicely done. However, I could find no place to leave a comment. I’ve also taken the liberty of linking your story so that others will read it. You’re #71.
      I’ll try to walk you through the link process which is really quite simple when you get the hang of it:

      If you scroll all the way to the bottom of the list you should see a little blue square on the lower left that says “add your link”. Click on the box and it will take you a screen that has three boxes. Copy and Paste your story URL into the first box. When you go to the next box it will automatically show your title. The last box is a place to leave your email. (Since I didn’t have your email, I simply left a dash in the box) Next it will give you the option of choosing an icon for the list. That’s all you do other thank clicking, “Take me back…”

      I hope this helps for the next time. 😉

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

  • Dear Dusty,
    Nice day for nostalgia? I learned to type on a manual typewriter. My school had one IBM Selectric, so, students had to rotate each week to get a chance at the “power.” These many years later the portability has improved, sadly my typing has not. Of course, now they call it keyboarding. Thankfully there’s no messy ribbon to contend with, and white out is a thing of the past.
    From one dust collector to another,
    Peace

    Like

    • Dear StepHonie,

      My mother so wanted me to take secretarial courses so I’d “have something to fall back on.” Because I preferred art, drama and foreign languages, she took the cow by the horns and taught me to at least type with my brother’s typing text book and a mammoth of an IBM electric. As I sit here not having to hunt and peck I wish she was here to thank. However if I still had to use a typewriter I’d also have to own a White Out concern. And ribbons? Forget about it. But I have to ask…do you ever catch yourself calling printer cartridges ribbons?

      Thank you for stopping to read and comment.

      Shalom,

      Dusty Rochelle

      Like

    • Dear Amy,

      I can’t even imagine what the future holds. So much of what we have now is the science fiction of my childhood. Communicators and on screen communication was Star Trek. Two-way wrist radios were Dick Tracy. Remember 8-tracks, black and white televisions that had to be adjusted with rabbit ears (tin foil to improve the signal). I suppose I could go on and on and…

      At any rate, thank you for coming by to read and leave nice comments.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

  • Dear Rochelle

    Thank you for the trip down memory lane. Manual typewriters, carbon paper, gestetner machines … my family stare in disbelief when I tell stories of my early office days.

    Great take on the prompt

    Take care

    Dee

    Like

  • In my case, it was I who wanted the computer and he kept saying no. So when he took a walk out the door and didn’t come back, one of the first things I did was move his chair out of the bedroom and put in a desk and my first computer!

    Like

  • Fun story, Rochelle. I’m not going to join in everybody’s lists of where we all started with technology, or someone might realise I’m old enough to have used carbon paper and a print eraser when I started, and the typewriter was a manual. No way am I going to go public with that admission.

    Like

  • Hey, while he’s going after a dust rag, have him get out the vacuum and the mop as well. You’re a WRITER, so you don’t have time to clean house anymore.

    This is so cute and such a glimpse of reality.

    Have you, by any chance, seen the movie “Desk Set” with Spencer Tracy and Katherine Hepburn? It’s my very favorite movie of all time, and it concerns a computer expert who is installing the first computer into a broadcasting company — thus threatening the jobs of scores of people. The movie’s really cute, but one of the things I like best is the nostalgic look at all the clothes, the attitudes, the behavior, and yes the technology — from that era. That computer — named Emmie — short for Emerack — is so huge it covers one whole wall of the research department. Things certainly have changed.

    Like

    • P.S. But I’m still holding on to my good old Canon electric typewriter — just in case. It was once the love of my life and my trusted companion in all things literary. I actually bought it with money I got when I sold the first computer I ever had. That computer had been given to me by my brother-in-law, and I spurned it as being a technology I’d never want to use. I have to laugh now, when I look around my house and see two desktop computers, two laptops, a Xerox professional size printer and a canon printer/scanner/copier — and I’m the only one who lives here!!!

      Like

      • Dear Sandra,

        I haven’t seen The Desk Set but I went and watched the trailer. I think it’s one I have to see.
        My IBM typewriter is long gone. I’m an avid backspace user. 😉 Now it’s hard to say which of us has more techno toys, Jan or me?
        Oh and he is very skilled with vacuum cleaner and does his own laundry.

        Good to see you. Thanks for stopping by.

        Shalom,

        Rochelle

        Like

  • Gah! Technology! It seems I am locked out of commenting on WordPress but strangely (and just discovered) I can still logon using private browsing. Ok rant over. My parents did try to send me to learn typing during the school break in High School but I only attended one class. And now I’ve been working in the IT industry for quarter of a century but I still can’t touch type 🙂

    Like

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