5 May 2017

Published May 3, 2017 by rochellewisoff

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Genre: Historical Fiction

Word Count: 100

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FOUNT OF LIFE

            “Andrea should know the truth,” said Myron. “May her father’s memory be blessed.”

            “The truth is she’s an American citizen now.” Cerulean eyes brimming, Gabrielle stroked her slumbering daughter’s golden curls. “Forget her father. Forget France.”

            Myron embraced his bride and drank in her fragrance. “Your survival is miracle.”  

            “A ‘miracle’ based on lies—forged papers and a fiancé in the Wermacht. Could’ve fooled Himmler himself.” She sniffed. “I should’ve died with my brunette sisters at Auschwitz.”

            Myron’s breath caught in his throat. “Fiancé?”   

            “The truth is my Albrecht loved me no matter what. I…willingly gave birth to his Lebensborn.”  

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102 comments on “5 May 2017

  • Dear Rochelle, the scale of horrors and and atrocities committed on the young and old alike by the SS under Hitler is just unimaginable. Your story brings out a heart touching tale of survival amidst such untold sorrows. As usual, brilliant is too little a word to describe your writing skills.

    Liked by 3 people

  • I can sympathize with your character or anyone who was caught up in that horror. While the children had a right to know the basic history so it wouldn’t be repeated, there was no need to traumatize them with personal memories they could do nothing about, at least until they were old enough to handle it. Good writing as always, Rochelle.

    Liked by 2 people

  • Survivor’s guilt times six million. In Art Spiegeman’s epic graphic novel Maus, his psychiatrist (a camp survivor himself) tells him that it wasn’t the best who died in the camps, nor the worst. It was random. That’s why it was so hard to comprehend. Well done.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Breathtaking – as in a story that sucks away one’s breath. I’m sure there were many mothers who wondered if they should be honest about their children’s lineage.
    A fabulous story you have woven.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Dale,

      Once more, your words humble me. It would be hard to share that kind of thing with your child. But, better to find out from the parent than someone else along the line. Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • Dear Rochelle,

    Phew, I just read that post you linked to. I knew it went on, but not all the details. My mother fitted the Aryan specifications exactly. As a teenager, I doubt that she relished the possibility of the Nazis occupying England D:

    People do what they can do to survive and it’s very hard to say that you would never do something under dire circumstances, because you just don’t know for sure, unless you actually experience them for yourself.

    I think it’s always important to tell a child their origins from the beginning, because if you lie to them and they find out later on, it can be devastating for everyone concerned and the child will never trust you again. That’s my opinion, anyway, but others might feel differently.

    As you can see by my comments, your story is most thought-provoking!

    All best wishes,
    Sarah

    Liked by 2 people

    • Dear Sarah,

      One of the greatest compliments an author can receive is ‘thought provoking.’ I relish them because I think it means the reader has forgotten the writing and gone straight to the marrow of the story.

      I, too, believe it’s important to tell a child his or her origins before he learns them from a stranger.

      Thank you for sharing your thoughts and comments.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

  • One of the greatest traits of your stories, and especially this one, is the historical education you link to them. I always read the link, and this one was very sad, horrific and revealing about the atrocities man is capable of. I came away with knowledge, that, I wish I didn’t have to know, but needed to. What a powerful story. Especially with the added link. I’m blown away.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Dear Jan,

      Nazi barbarism and stupidity never ceases to amaze me. Tragically, their attempts to create a master race backfired. From what I’ve read, most of the progeny turned out to be average or below. Way to go, Himmler.
      Your generous compliments blow me away, m’love. Thank you.

      Rochelle

      Like

  • Thanks for the link to the article, Rochelle – it makes for chilling reading. It’s terrifying when authoritarian governments take control over family life (another example being the ‘One child’ policy in China which also brought about untold suffering) – such very personal trauma all caused by one man with a lot of power deciding who was ‘pure’ and who was not. The emotional fall out for those children is unimaginable. Having to deal with such a history. A wonderful tale, Rochelle. You’re very good at personalising these huge moments in history, making them about people not just statistics.

    Liked by 1 person

  • I almost wrote my story based on Nazi occupied France, but it turned out to be too much like others I’d recently written, so I reworked the whole thing.

    As you said above, horror and tragedy didn’t begin with Hitler nor did it end with him.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Ah yes. This was the Nazi eugenics program. They truly believed they might create a super race. It’s just one more indication of Nazi insanity. Great story, Rochelle, and I really liked the follow on link. It’s very informative.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Bridget,

      I don’t know about my mother’s side of the family, but I do know that my great grandparents came over from Lithuania in the late 1800’s with a passport other than their own. The original surname was Bader. The passport was for the “Wissosky” family. Rather than go through the hassle of changing it back after they came to the States, they merely shortened it to “Wisoff.” Viva forged papers! 😉

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 2 people

  • Dear Lavender Chamomile,

    We have similar program here in the U.S. for breeding idiots. Unfortunately, they grow up to be voters and elect candidates from the Blackwell Institute for Lower Learning and Bad Manners to public offices. Oy, don’t get me started.

    Enjoyed your little tale of racial impurity. Boy, that Gabriele sure spilled her guts. Guilt must have been weighing heavily on her conscience. Perhaps some calming herbs would help.

    regards,
    Dr. Lack-O-Manners

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Dr. Lack-O-Manners,

      Perhaps it’s all the inbreeding…asses with humans. Wouldn’t Himmler have been surprised to find out that blue eyed-blonde Gabrielle was a Yiddishborn? Just a little y-knot in this story. 😉 Thank you for taking time off from your Institute students.

      Shalom,

      Lav-Cham

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Dahlia,

      It seems there was no end to the horror and cruelty of the Nazi monsters. I’m appalled that just when I think I’ve heard them all, another one rears its ugly head. We must never forget. Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

  • Dear Rochelle,
    Your last line is devastating.
    As I understand it Albrecht loved Gabrielle, in spite of being a German soldier, so much so that he helped her leave the country and be safe with their daughter, endangering his own life. Gabrielle confesses she loved him, too. Such enormous sacrifice they both had to make for their daughter.
    Should she be told the truth? Definitely and adamantly yes, she should know her biological father loved her. Nowadays with DNA easily available, she may find out accidentally in the future, and it would be much worse. The question is when and how to tell her. They should seek professional help.
    I feel sorry for Myron, I hope he’s able to understand, be generous and love them both.
    Powerful story. It can’t have been easy to write.
    Thank you for sharing and giving us so much to think about.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Luccia,

      Actually the way I saw it was that Albrecht loved her in spite of the danger of loving a Jew. He passed her off as Aryan since she was blonde and blue-eyed. And entered the lebensborn program.
      I totally agree with your thoughts about telling Andrea. I’m not sure myself how Myron will react, but in my mind, they’re married and he loves both Gabrielle and her daughter. He knows she passed for Aryan and that was how she survived…the fact that his Jewish bride was actually in love with a Wermacht soldier is news. My guess is that Albrecht didn’t survive the war. 😦 In my mind he was a righteous man. (Hmm…) Might be a story to expand.
      At any rate, thank you so much. It’s quite a compliment to the author for the reader to become so involved.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

  • Querida Rochelle,
    Otra historia muy triste pero muy bien escrito. (Another sad story very well written – for people who want to know – a translation)
    Your writing on these historical stories pulls on the heartstrings when being read.
    This is another brilliant write, mi amiga.
    Thank you for stating that we have time to ruminate on the photo prompt. I like to observe the photo until something pops into my mind. PHEW … I was feeling like I was always late.
    It looks like the weekend is upon us once again …. Happy Happy
    Abrazos y Shalom,
    Isadora 😎

    Liked by 1 person

  • Sad tale Rochelle, even more tragic in its truth. The brunette part reminded me of the apartheid “tests” performed on people who were mixed race. Their fairer skin may qualify them for “white”. One of these tests was to pass a pencil through the hair. If it slipped easily through, they passed for white and entitled to the privileges. If not, then you were a second class citizen with less rights. I have heard of siblings separated and growing up in entirely different lives because of this race classification system. Although abolished, I think such prejudice still exists in social forms today. Thank you for sharing Rochelle these glimpses into those lives affected by the holocaust 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  • Thanks Rochelle, yet again you’ve taught me about something I had no idea about. The Nazis were completely moral cripples , the more I learn the more flabbergasted I become

    Liked by 1 person

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