21 June 2019

Published June 19, 2019 by rochellewisoff

Dear Friday Fictioneers,

While I realize my page is FF central where you come for the prompt and instructions,the lower half of the page is also my comment section. In light of this, I have a favor to ask of all of you. When you have an issue such as problems with linking in the inLinkz or have a technical question, please direct these to my email runtshell@gmail.com. I check my email as often as I look at my comments (which I also appreciate greatly). Thank you for your consideration.

Shalom,

Rochelle

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The next photo is the PROMPT. Remember, all photos are property of the photographer, donated for use in Friday Fictioneers only. They shouldn’t be used for any other purpose without express permission. It is proper etiquette to give the contributor credit. 

PHOTO PROMPT © Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

Click the Frog and Hop on board. 

Genre: Recent Memoir

Word Count: 100

SWEET FULFILLMENT

At Ben Gurion airport in Tel-Aviv my cousin and I settled in for a twelve-hour wait.

A young man clutching a colorful bouquet and heart-shaped balloon caught our attention.

“Do you suppose he’s waiting for his arranged-for bride?” asked Kent.

“Doubtful. You’d never see a Hasid in shorts.”

My curiosity piqued. What would she look like? Our hero checked his watch. We checked ours.

At last his pretty sweetheart rushed into his arms. They laughed. They cried. They kissed.

“How romantic.” I sighed. “Dontcha just love a happy ending?”

“Yeah. Now what do we do for the next eleven hours?”

Cuzzin Kent and me at the Western Wall. © Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

103 comments on “21 June 2019

  • I loved this. I have waited in airports longer than anyone would want to. I particularly like how you showed our natural curiosity by observing other people. When someone catches our attention we let our imagination run. If you look closely enough you can almost see their whole life. The overweight business man, tapping away on his computer or the tired bored children who can not settle. In this case you saw the man with the ballon and we have a happy ending, although we know nothing about them – we feel justified because we guessed this momnet correctly. So what do you do for the next few empty hours of waiting – perhaps you are missing a good book?

    I will post my contribution on Friday.

    Best regards,

    James

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear James,

      Oh yes, there were plenty of children who wouldn’t settle. (Universal, no matter the race). In Israel, the Ultra Orthodox make for interesting watching. So many different types from all around the globe. I was missing a good book but had the companionship of a good friend. Thank you. See you Friday. 😀

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 2 people

  • A good memoir, Rochelle. At least you had Kent there to talk to. It’s a great opportunity for a writer I’m told. I was waiting in the Chicago airport one time and laughing because of my daughter doing selfies of her face in different moods. That’s what an actor does. Good writing as always. 😀 — Suzanne

    Liked by 1 person

  • Hahaha! I imagine a 12 hour wait with limited options to fill the time would give YOU a great opportunity to exercise your imagination and create storylines! I don’t usually get much farther than deciding the relationships between members of groups I observe. I don’t remember ever getting the satisfaction of learning if my analysis was correct, lol.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Frances,

      Mostly during that particular 12 hour wait I was trying to talk my stomach into settling. It was fun to observe the young romance. People watching is a great source of entertainment though. 😉 Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • You’re both writers. So now here’s the perfect opportunity to restock your libraries of character observations. Of course, eleven hours might be a tad over-facing… might need to intersperse it with some plot development too. I’m sure you used the time to your best advantage.

    Liked by 1 person

  • I hate waiting in airports… But then again, I guess there are a thousand stories at every gate, like your young couple in love. Nicely done. And when you say “recent memoir”, I assume you mean VERY recent.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Trent,

      I’m not crazy about waiting in airports, but it can be interesting. However 12 hours was overkill. Due to extenuating circumstances it couldn’t be helped. :/ And yes, recent memoir as in last month. 😉 Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Josh,

      36 hours??? Yikes. The 12 hour flight from Tel Aviv followed by another 8 hours or so of shorter flights and layovers was quite enough. I hope your brother’s time in India made up for the travel time. Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Rachel,

      It’s for certain I can think of better places to have 12 hours with nothing to do. 😉 However, the day before we did take advantage of having a day with nothing to do and wandered the streets of Jerusalem. All together the trip was wonderfully memorable. 😀 Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • Dear Rochelle,

    Wonderful story. I was lucky the last time I had an 11-hour layover. A friend picked me up at the airport and gave me a tour of Zug, Switzerland! Otherwise, I try to avoid those overly long layovers. Only so much reading, people watching and walking a person can do!

    Always a joy reading you,

    Shalom and lotsa love,

    Dale

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Dale,

      I envy you your friend in Switzerland. At least I wasn’t alone. With Kent there’s never a lack for conversation. Although neither of us were feeling too great. We did, however run into some other KC friends that helped pass the time. Thank you for your kind and encouraging words…always.

      Shalom and lotsa hugs,

      Rochelle

      Liked by 1 person

  • i could only commiserate. the worst thing that happened to me was on a flight to scotland from chicago. due to a storm, the flight was cancelled for the next day. since it was weather-related, i had to pay for my own hotel accommodation. such is life.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Patrick,

      Thank you for adding to my vocabulary. 😀 I had to look up ‘busk’. Indeed, we should have. If only I’d had my whiteface makup with me. I suppose I could have donned the red nose. 😉 Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • What a sweet story with such great observations. But isn’t it unfair that we usually are too nervous to do anything substantial when we have to wait? I always think I could write now, but I’m usually too tense and can’t concentrate. People watching is a good thing though.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Gabi,

      I thought about taking out my laptop during the wait, but honestly, that day I wasn’t feeling too well. There were some interesting people to watch and a good friend to talk to to pass the time. Thank you.

      Shalom,

      Rochelle

      Like

  • You create the here and now of a long,long wait at the airport so clearly, felt I was there too. A romantic couple is a gem for people watching, I think. Sat in an airport, I can enjoy watching a brief encounter without knowing how the story ends – so you have to make it up yourself !
    Love the photo.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Haha, love the last line. There’s only so much people-watching I can do before getting bored of it. I always wonder about the couples that seem so in love… who knows if they’ll still be together next month or next year? Maybe that’s just me being cynical. 😉

    You didn’t have any books (paper or electronic) with you? From that picture, it looks like a nice airport.

    Liked by 1 person

  • People watching at the airport is a great way to while away the time, Rochelle. Once I bought the paper to do the crossword, it came with a free bottle of water, I know I shouldn’t have but once I’d finished the crossword I drank the water. As we boarded I was bursting. That was the most excruciating taxi and take off I’ve ever experienced. I was begging for the seat belt signs to be turned off.

    Liked by 1 person

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